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      Prevention and Treatment of Opioid Misuse and Addiction : A Review

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          Abstract

          More than 42 000 Americans died of opioid overdoses in 2016, and the fatalities continue to increase. This review analyzes the factors that triggered the opioid crisis and its further evolution, along with the interventions to manage and prevent opioid use disorder (OUD), which are fundamental for curtailing the opioid crisis.

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          Most cited references37

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          Medical cannabis laws and opioid analgesic overdose mortality in the United States, 1999-2010.

          Opioid analgesic overdose mortality continues to rise in the United States, driven by increases in prescribing for chronic pain. Because chronic pain is a major indication for medical cannabis, laws that establish access to medical cannabis may change overdose mortality related to opioid analgesics in states that have enacted them.
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            Comparative epidemiology of dependence on tobacco, alcohol, controlled substances, and inhalants: Basic findings from the National Comorbidity Survey.

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              Medical Marijuana Laws Reduce Prescription Medication Use In Medicare Part D.

              Legalization of medical marijuana has been one of the most controversial areas of state policy change over the past twenty years. However, little is known about whether medical marijuana is being used clinically to any significant degree. Using data on all prescriptions filled by Medicare Part D enrollees from 2010 to 2013, we found that the use of prescription drugs for which marijuana could serve as a clinical alternative fell significantly, once a medical marijuana law was implemented. National overall reductions in Medicare program and enrollee spending when states implemented medical marijuana laws were estimated to be $165.2 million per year in 2013. The availability of medical marijuana has a significant effect on prescribing patterns and spending in Medicare Part D.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                JAMA Psychiatry
                JAMA Psychiatry
                American Medical Association (AMA)
                2168-622X
                December 05 2018
                Affiliations
                [1 ]National Institute on Drug Abuse, Rockville, Maryland
                Article
                10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2018.3126
                30516809
                aaa710e1-86df-4f0f-94d7-096d014eeacc
                © 2018
                History

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