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      Intra-BLA or intra-NAc infusions of the dopamine D3 receptor partial agonist, BP 897, block intra-NAc amphetamine conditioned activity.

      1 ,
      Behavioral neuroscience
      American Psychological Association (APA)

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          Abstract

          Recent studies have shown that both systemic and intra-nucleus accumbens (NAc) or intra-amygdala administration of dopamine D3 receptor ligands modulate reward-related learning. A previous study (H. Aujla, H. Sokoloff, & R. J. Beninger. 2002) showed that systemic administration of the partial dopamine D3 receptor agonist BP 897 selectively blocked the expression, but not the acquisition, of amphetamine-conditioned activity. This suggested the hypothesis that intra-NAc or intra-basolateral amygdala (BLA) BP 897 would attenuate the expression, but not the acquisition, of amphetamine-conditioned activity. Rats were habituated to activity-monitoring chambers for 5 days, for 1 hr each day. Conditioning occurred on the next 3 days, followed by a single 1-hr test session. Intra-NAc or intra-BLA infusions of BP 897 during test, but not during conditioning, attenuated intra-NAc amphetamine conditioned activity. Results indicate that the ability of BP 897 to attenuate the expression of conditioned activity is mediated in part by the NAc and BLA.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Behav. Neurosci.
          Behavioral neuroscience
          American Psychological Association (APA)
          0735-7044
          0735-7044
          Dec 2004
          : 118
          : 6
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. haujla@scripps.edu
          Article
          2004-21410-018
          10.1037/0735-7044.118.6.1324
          15598141
          aaab5ccd-be9d-438a-a1b3-2be657d39841
          History

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