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      Changes in satellite-derived spring vegetation green-up date and its linkage to climate in China from 1982 to 2010: a multimethod analysis

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          Abstract

          The change in spring phenology is recognized to exert a major influence on carbon balance dynamics in temperate ecosystems. Over the past several decades, several studies focused on shifts in spring phenology; however, large uncertainties still exist, and one understudied source could be the method implemented in retrieving satellite-derived spring phenology. To account for this potential uncertainty, we conducted a multimethod investigation to quantify changes in vegetation green-up date from 1982 to 2010 over temperate China, and to characterize climatic controls on spring phenology. Over temperate China, the five methods estimated that the vegetation green-up onset date advanced, on average, at a rate of 1.3 ± 0.6 days per decade (ranging from 0.4 to 1.9 days per decade) over the last 29 years. Moreover, the sign of the trends in vegetation green-up date derived from the five methods were broadly consistent spatially and for different vegetation types, but with large differences in the magnitude of the trend. The large intermethod variance was notably observed in arid and semiarid vegetation types. Our results also showed that change in vegetation green-up date is more closely correlated with temperature than with precipitation. However, the temperature sensitivity of spring vegetation green-up date became higher as precipitation increased, implying that precipitation is an important regulator of the response of vegetation spring phenology to change in temperature. This intricate linkage between spring phenology and precipitation must be taken into account in current phenological models which are mostly driven by temperature. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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          Most cited references 46

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          Ecological and Evolutionary Responses to Recent Climate Change

          Ecological changes in the phenology and distribution of plants and animals are occurring in all well-studied marine, freshwater, and terrestrial groups. These observed changes are heavily biased in the directions predicted from global warming and have been linked to local or regional climate change through correlations between climate and biological variation, field and laboratory experiments, and physiological research. Range-restricted species, particularly polar and mountaintop species, show severe range contractions and have been the first groups in which entire species have gone extinct due to recent climate change. Tropical coral reefs and amphibians have been most negatively affected. Predator-prey and plant-insect interactions have been disrupted when interacting species have responded differently to warming. Evolutionary adaptations to warmer conditions have occurred in the interiors of species' ranges, and resource use and dispersal have evolved rapidly at expanding range margins. Observed genetic shifts modulate local effects of climate change, but there is little evidence that they will mitigate negative effects at the species level.
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            FLUXNET: A New Tool to Study the Temporal and Spatial Variability of Ecosystem–Scale Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Flux Densities

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              An extended AVHRR 8-km NDVI dataset compatible with MODIS and SPOT vegetation NDVI data

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Global Change Biology
                Glob Change Biol
                Wiley
                13541013
                March 2013
                March 2013
                December 21 2012
                : 19
                : 3
                : 881-891
                Affiliations
                [1 ]College of Urban and Environmental Sciences; Sino-French Institute for Earth System Science; Key Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes of the Ministry of Education; Peking University; Beijing; 100871; China
                [2 ]Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement; CEA CNRS UVSQ; Gif sur Yvette; 91191; France
                [3 ]Department of Geography and Environment; Boston University; 675 Commonwealth Avenue; Boston; MA; 02215; USA
                Article
                10.1111/gcb.12077
                23504844
                © 2012
                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/gcb.12077

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