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      Genetic screening for quality-of-life improvement and post–genetic testing consideration in Saudi Arabia

      , 1 , 2

      Family Medicine and Community Health

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      Genetic screening, diet, fitness, nutrition

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          Abstract

          The Saudi genome project started in 2013 with a great hope to improve medical care and disease prevention. Among the genes are those related to nutrition and fitness that can optimize an individual’s lifestyle. Our aim was to review the knowledge and acceptance of nutrition and fitness genetic testing to enhance the quality of life among the population of Saudi Arabia. For the study an electronic questionnaire consisting of 27 questions was prepared, and it was answered by 302 respondents. The respondents’ demographics showed about 50% of respondents were aged 18–25 years and about 50% of respondents were aged 26–60 years. More than 50% of respondents were interested in having a genetic test to enhance their health, while 40% were interested in having a genetic test to enhance their fitness. Less than 50% of respondents had an understanding of the effects of coffee, macronutrition and micronutrition, elements, and enzyme activity. These results represented a contribution to the discussion on the relevance of genetic testing validity and acceptance among the population of Saudi Arabia. The results might help in producing specific guidelines on genetic testing and genomic analysis and help in the implementation of fitness and future health plans in cooperation with Saudi genome projects. Future study will focus on population structure and genetic frequency related to specific diets or fitness.

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          Use of Dietary Supplements among Professional Athletes in Saudi Arabia

          The objective of this study was to understand the usage patterns of dietary supplements among professional athletes in Saudi Arabia. The survey consisted of sixteen questions divided into four categories: use of supplements, reason for consumption of supplements, personal beliefs about supplements, and behavior. The questionnaires were given to the three teams residing in Riyadh: Al Hilal, Al Nasr, and Al-Shabab. Out of the 105 athletes surveyed, we found that only 98 are currently taking dietary supplements and the mean age and standard deviation were 25.74 ± 2.90. The survey results showed a high percentage of athletes (93.3%; n = 98) using different dietary supplements throughout the season, 43.8% (n = 43) reported using supplements for performance, and 32.6% (n = 32) believed in health benefits as a reason for using dietary supplements. Our results showed that a total of 87 (88.7%), 81 (82.6%), and 51 (52.0%) athletes are consuming sports drinks, vitamin C, and multivitamins, respectively. Meanwhile, those supplements ranking among the least used included omega 6 (18.6%), creatine (16.3%), and Ginkgo biloba (10.2%). A majority of athletes indicated that their use of supplements was for the purpose of improving their health and performance.
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            Genetic testing and genomic analysis: a debate on ethical, social and legal issues in the Arab world with a focus on Qatar

            In 2013 both Saudi Arabia and Qatar launched genome projects with the aim of providing information for better diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases and, ultimately to realize personalized medicine by sequencing hundred thousands samples. These population based genome activities raise a series of relevant ethical, legal and social issues general, related to the specific population structure as well as to the Islamic perspective on genomic analysis and genetic testing. To contribute to the debate, the Authors after reviewing the existing literature and taking advantage of their professional experience in the field and in the geographic area, discuss and provide their opinions. In particular, the Authors focus on the impact of consanguinity on population structure and disease frequency in the Arab world, on genetic testing and genomic analysis (i.e. technical aspects, impact, etc.) and on their regulations. A comparison between the Islamic perspective and the ethical, social and legal issues raised in other population contexts is also carried. In conclusion, this opinion article with an up-to-date contribution to the discussion on the relevance and impact of genomic analysis and genetic testing in the Arab world, might help in producing specific national guidelines on genetic testing and genomic analysis and help accelerate the implementation and roll out of genome projects in Muslim countries and more specifically in Qatar, and other countries of the Gulf.
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              Albai G, Strait J, et al

               A Scuteri,  S Sanna,  WM Chen (2007)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                FMCH
                Family Medicine and Community Health
                FMCH
                Compuscript (Ireland )
                2009-8774
                2305-6983
                May 2018
                May 2018
                : 6
                : 2
                : 70-76
                Affiliations
                1Biotechnology Department, King Faisal University, Al Hofuf, Al Ahsa, Saudi Arabia
                2School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing, College of Business, Massey University, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North, 4442, Albany, New Zealand
                Author notes
                CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Faten Dhawi, Biotechnology Department, King Faisal University, Al Hofuf, Al Ahsa, Saudi Arabia, E-mail: dr.faten.dhawi@ 123456gmail.com ; falmuhanna@ 123456kfu.edu.sa
                Article
                FMCH.2018.0108
                10.15212/FMCH.2018.0108
                Copyright © 2018 Family Medicine and Community Health

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License (CC BY-NC 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

                Product
                Self URI (journal page): http://fmch-journal.org/
                Funding
                This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.
                Categories
                Original Research

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