33
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      COPD: balancing oxidants and antioxidants

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common chronic illnesses in the world. The disease encompasses emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and small airway obstruction and can be caused by environmental exposures, primarily cigarette smoking. Since only a small subset of smokers develop COPD, it is believed that host factors interact with the environment to increase the propensity to develop disease. The major pathogenic factors causing disease include infection and inflammation, protease and antiprotease imbalance, and oxidative stress overwhelming antioxidant defenses. In this review, we will discuss the major environmental and host sources for oxidative stress; discuss how oxidative stress regulates chronic bronchitis; review the latest information on genetic predisposition to COPD, specifically focusing on oxidant/antioxidant imbalance; and review future antioxidant therapeutic options for COPD. The complexity of COPD will necessitate a multi-target therapeutic approach. It is likely that antioxidant supplementation and dietary antioxidants will have a place in these future combination therapies.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 145

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Effects of a combination of beta carotene and vitamin A on lung cancer and cardiovascular disease.

          Lung cancer and cardiovascular disease are major causes of death in the United States. It has been proposed that carotenoids and retinoids are agents that may prevent these disorders. We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled primary prevention trial -- the Beta Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial -- involving a total of 18,314 smokers, former smokers, and workers exposed to asbestos. The effects of a combination of 30 mg of beta carotene per day and 25,000 IU of retinol (vitamin A) in the form of retinyl palmitate per day on the primary end point, the incidence of lung cancer, were compared with those of placebo. A total of 388 new cases of lung cancer were diagnosed during the 73,135 person-years of follow-up (mean length of follow-up, 4.0 years). The active-treatment group had a relative risk of lung cancer of 1.28 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.04 to 1.57; P=0.02), as compared with the placebo group. There were no statistically significant differences in the risks of other types of cancer. In the active-treatment group, the relative risk of death from any cause was 1.17 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.33); of death from lung cancer, 1.46 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.07 to 2.00); and of death from cardiovascular disease, 1.26 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.99 to 1.61). On the basis of these findings, the randomized trial was stopped 21 months earlier than planned; follow-up will continue for another 5 years. After an average of four years of supplementation, the combination of beta carotene and vitamin A had no benefit and may have had an adverse effect on the incidence of lung cancer and on the risk of death from lung cancer, cardiovascular disease, and any cause in smokers and workers exposed to asbestos.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Airway mucus function and dysfunction.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Antioxidants in human health and disease.

               B Halliwell (1995)
              Free radicals and antioxidants are widely discussed in the clinical and nutritional literature. Antioxidants are needed to prevent the formation and oppose the actions of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which are generated in vivo and cause damage to DNA, lipids, proteins, and other biomolecules. Endogenous antioxidant defenses (superoxide dismutases, H2O2-removing enzymes, metal binding proteins) are inadequate to prevent damage completely, so diet-derived antioxidants are important in maintaining health. Many dietary compounds have been suggested to be important antioxidants: The evidence for a key role of vitamins E and C is strong, but that for carotenoids and related plant pigments is weaker. Interest is also growing in the role of plant phenolics, especially flavonoids. Some antioxidants can exert prooxidant effects in vitro, but their physiological relevance is uncertain. Experimental approaches to the optimization of antioxidant nutrient intake are proposed.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                2015
                02 February 2015
                : 10
                : 261-276
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
                [2 ]Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Richmond at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
                [3 ]National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, US Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Bernard M Fischer, Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Box 103201, Durham, NC 27710, USA, Tel + 1 919 660 0258, Fax +1 919 668 3750, Email bernie.fischer@ 123456duke.edu

                *These authors contributed equally to this work

                Article
                copd-10-261
                10.2147/COPD.S42414
                4321570
                © 2015 Fischer et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Review

                Comments

                Comment on this article