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      Comparison of family partnership intervention care vs. conventional care in adult patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes in a community hospital: A randomized controlled trial

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      International Journal of Nursing Studies

      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          Although there is a significant correlation between the degree of family support and clinical outcome, little research has focused on the effectiveness of family partnership intervention care (FPIC) for patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to compare FPIC with conventional care (CC) across a number of outcome measures in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. The study was performed using a randomized controlled trial design. Patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes who were solely treated with oral antidiabetic agents and had at least two out of three hemoglobin A1C readings equal to or above 7% in the previous 12 months, were randomly assigned to the FPIC group (n=28) and to the CC group (n=28). Baseline and 6-month follow-up scores were compared using the following outcome measures: (1) hemoglobin A1C, (2) BMI, (3) lipid profile, (4) family supportive behaviours, (5), knowledge of and attitudes toward diabetes, and (6) diabetes self-care behaviours. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were employed to compare differences in outcome measures between the groups. There were no significant differences in the reduction of hemoglobin A1C levels (p=0.46), lipid profile values (p>0.05), and improvement of diabetes self-care behaviours (p=0.61) between the groups at 6 months post-intervention. However, there were significant differences in the scores of family supportive behaviours (p=0.031) and patients' knowledge of and attitudes toward diabetes between the groups (p<0.05). These findings support the use of FPIC to enhance family supportive behaviours, and to improve patients' knowledge of and attitudes toward diabetes. Thus, the study is of value in helping policy decision-makers to develop more effective diabetes control intervention programmes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          International Journal of Nursing Studies
          International Journal of Nursing Studies
          Elsevier BV
          00207489
          November 2010
          November 2010
          : 47
          : 11
          : 1363-1373
          Article
          10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2010.03.009
          20371056
          © 2010

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