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      Effortful Control, Executive Functions, and Education: Bringing Self-Regulatory and Social-Emotional Competencies to the Table : Self-Regulation and Education

      Child Development Perspectives

      Wiley-Blackwell

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          Most cited references 52

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          School readiness. Integrating cognition and emotion in a neurobiological conceptualization of children's functioning at school entry.

           Clancy Blair (2002)
          The author examines the construct of emotionality, developmental relations between cognition and emotion, and neural plasticity and frontal cortical functioning and proposes a developmental neurobiological model of children's school readiness. Direct links are proposed among emotionality, use-dependent synaptic stabilization related to the prefrontal cortex, the development of executive function abilities, and academic and social competence in school settings. The author considers research on the efficacy of preschool compensatory education in promoting school readiness and recommends that programs expand to include curricula directly addressing social and emotional competence. Research should focus on the ontogeny of self-regulation and successful adaptation to the socially defined role of student, the development of prevention research programs to reflect this orientation, and interdisciplinary collaborations that integrate scientific methods and questions in the pursuit of comprehensive knowledge of human developmental processes.
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            Can instructional and emotional support in the first-grade classroom make a difference for children at risk of school failure?

            This study examined ways in which children's risk of school failure may be moderated by support from teachers. Participants were 910 children in a national prospective study. Children were identified as at risk at ages 5-6 years on the basis of demographic characteristics and the display of multiple functional (behavioral, attention, academic, social) problems reported by their kindergarten teachers. By the end of first grade, at-risk students placed in first-grade classrooms offering strong instructional and emotional support had achievement scores and student-teacher relationships commensurate with their low-risk peers; at-risk students placed in less supportive classrooms had lower achievement and more conflict with teachers. These findings have implications for understanding the role that classroom experience may play in pathways to positive adaptation.
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              The teacher-child relationship and children's early school adjustment

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Child Development Perspectives
                Wiley-Blackwell
                17508592
                June 2012
                June 2012
                : 6
                : 2
                : 105-111
                Article
                10.1111/j.1750-8606.2011.00196.x
                © 2012

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