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      Human hypertrophic and keloid scar models: principles, limitations and future challenges from a tissue engineering perspective

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          Abstract

          Most cutaneous wounds heal with scar formation. Ideally, an inconspicuous normotrophic scar is formed, but an abnormal scar (hypertrophic scar or keloid) can also develop. A major challenge to scientists and physicians is to prevent adverse scar formation after severe trauma (e.g. burn injury) and understand why some individuals will form adverse scars even after relatively minor injury. Currently, many different models exist to study scar formation, ranging from simple monolayer cell culture to 3D tissue-engineered models even to humanized mouse models. Currently, these high-/medium-throughput test models avoid the main questions referring to why an adverse scar forms instead of a normotrophic scar and what causes a hypertrophic scar to form rather than a keloid scar and also, how is the genetic predisposition of the individual and the immune system involved. This information is essential if we are to identify new drug targets and develop optimal strategies in the future to prevent adverse scar formation. This viewpoint review summarizes the progress on in vitro and animal scar models, stresses the limitations in the current models and identifies the future challenges if scar-free healing is to be achieved in the future.

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          Rapid planetesimal formation in turbulent circumstellar discs

          The initial stages of planet formation in circumstellar gas discs proceed via dust grains that collide and build up larger and larger bodies (Safronov 1969). How this process continues from metre-sized boulders to kilometre-scale planetesimals is a major unsolved problem (Dominik et al. 2007): boulders stick together poorly (Benz 2000), and spiral into the protostar in a few hundred orbits due to a head wind from the slower rotating gas (Weidenschilling 1977). Gravitational collapse of the solid component has been suggested to overcome this barrier (Safronov 1969, Goldreich & Ward 1973, Youdin & Shu 2002). Even low levels of turbulence, however, inhibit sedimentation of solids to a sufficiently dense midplane layer (Weidenschilling & Cuzzi 1993, Dominik et al. 2007), but turbulence must be present to explain observed gas accretion in protostellar discs (Hartmann 1998). Here we report the discovery of efficient gravitational collapse of boulders in locally overdense regions in the midplane. The boulders concentrate initially in transient high pressures in the turbulent gas (Johansen, Klahr, & Henning 2006), and these concentrations are augmented a further order of magnitude by a streaming instability (Youdin & Goodman 2005, Johansen, Henning, & Klahr 2006, Johansen & Youdin 2007) driven by the relative flow of gas and solids. We find that gravitationally bound clusters form with masses comparable to dwarf planets and containing a distribution of boulder sizes. Gravitational collapse happens much faster than radial drift, offering a possible path to planetesimal formation in accreting circumstellar discs.
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            The Dicke Quantum Phase Transition with a Superfluid Gas in an Optical Cavity

            A phase transition describes the sudden change of state in a physical system, such as the transition between a fluid and a solid. Quantum gases provide the opportunity to establish a direct link between experiment and generic models which capture the underlying physics. A fundamental concept to describe the collective matter-light interaction is the Dicke model which has been predicted to show an intriguing quantum phase transition. Here we realize the Dicke quantum phase transition in an open system formed by a Bose-Einstein condensate coupled to an optical cavity, and observe the emergence of a self-organized supersolid phase. The phase transition is driven by infinitely long-ranged interactions between the condensed atoms. These are induced by two-photon processes involving the cavity mode and a pump field. We show that the phase transition is described by the Dicke Hamiltonian, including counter-rotating coupling terms, and that the supersolid phase is associated with a spontaneously broken spatial symmetry. The boundary of the phase transition is mapped out in quantitative agreement with the Dicke model. The work opens the field of quantum gases with long-ranged interactions, and provides access to novel quantum phases.
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              The basic science of wound healing.

              Understanding wound healing today involves much more than simply stating that there are three phases: "inflammation, proliferation, and maturation." Wound healing is a complex series of reactions and interactions among cells and "mediators." Each year, new mediators are discovered and our understanding of inflammatory mediators and cellular interactions grows. This article will attempt to provide a concise report of the current literature on wound healing by first reviewing the phases of wound healing followed by "the players" of wound healing: inflammatory mediators (cytokines, growth factors, proteases, eicosanoids, kinins, and more), nitric oxide, and the cellular elements. The discussion will end with a pictorial essay summarizing the wound-healing process.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Exp Dermatol
                Exp. Dermatol
                exd
                Experimental Dermatology
                BlackWell Publishing Ltd (Oxford, UK )
                0906-6705
                1600-0625
                June 2014
                28 May 2014
                : 23
                : 6
                : 382-386
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Dermatology, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands
                [2 ]Research Institute MOVE Amsterdam, The Netherlands
                [3 ]Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands
                [4 ]Department of Oral Cell Biology, Academic Center for Dentistry (ACTA) Amsterdam, The Netherlands
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Susan Gibbs, Department of Dermatology (Room 2BR-028), VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Tel.: 0031-20-4442815, Fax: 0031-20-4442816, e-mail: S.Gibbs@ 123456vumc.nl
                Article
                10.1111/exd.12419
                4369123
                24750541
                ab89cc80-0f12-41d3-bb73-ba7c0a91ebc0
                © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Dermatology. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

                This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

                History
                : 15 April 2014
                Categories
                Viewpoints

                Dermatology
                hypertrophic,keloid,in vitro,organotypic,organ-on-a-chip,scar
                Dermatology
                hypertrophic, keloid, in vitro, organotypic, organ-on-a-chip, scar

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