Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
2 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Interactions among Myzus persicae, predators and parasitoids may hamper biological control in Mediterranean peach orchards

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is a serious pests of peach trees. It has traditionally been managed with insecticides, but social concerns on insecticides use claim for alternative control strategies. Aphids are attacked by many natural enemies, so the use of conservation biological control could be feasible. However, the existence of a wide array of natural enemies increases the chances of intraguild predation and can also trigger behavioral changes in aphids. To evaluate interactions among predators and parasitoids of M. persicae, we conducted laboratory experiments to determine the contribution of three predators, Episyrphus balteatus DeGeer (Diptera: Syrphidae), Aphidoletes aphidimyza (Rondani) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), and Orius majusculus (Reuter) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae), to the control of M. persicae. In addition, we examined changes in aphid behavior due to cornicle exudate and the interaction of the aforementioned predators with the parasitoid Aphidius matricariae (Haliday) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Our results showed that the most voracious predator was E. balteatus followed by A. aphidimyza. At 72 hours, the aphid population had tripled in the arenas where cornicle exudate was present compared to those where it was absent. In a confined environment, the presence of a single individual of A. aphidimyza and O. majusculus in conjunction with the parasitoid increased the aphid population instead of reducing it. However, the fact that all predators avoided feeding on mummified aphids and that A. aphidimyza and O. majusculus preferred to feed on unparasitized aphids highlight the possibility that parasitoids and predators can jointly contribute to aphid control.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 48

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Intraguild predation: The dynamics of complex trophic interactions.

          There is a long-standing debate in ecology concerning the relative importance of competition and predation in determining community structure. Recently, a novel twist has been added with the growing recognition that potentially competing species are often engaged in predator-prey interactions. This blend of competition and predation is called intraguild predation (IGP). The study of IGP will lead to a reconsideration of many classical topics, such as niche shifts, species exclusion and cascading interactions in food webs. Theoretical models suggest that a variety of alternative stable states are likely in IGP systems, and that intermediate predators should tend to be superior in exploitative competition. Many field studies support these expectations. IGP is also important in applied ecological problems, such as the conservation of endangered species and fisheries management. Copyright © 1992. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The Chemical Ecology of Aphids

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              PREDATORS, PARASITOIDS, AND PATHOGENS AS MORTALITY AGENTS IN PHYTOPHAGOUS INSECT POPULATIONS

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                entomologia
                Entomologia Generalis
                Journal of General and Applied Entomology - Zeitschrift für Allgemeine und Angewandte Entomologie
                entomologia
                Schweizerbart Science Publishers (Stuttgart, Germany http://www.schweizerbart.com/ mail@ 123456schweizerbart.de )
                0171-8177
                3 November 2020
                21 September 2020
                : 40
                : 3
                : 217-228
                Affiliations
                IRTA, Sustainable Plant Protection Programme, Ctra. de Cabrils Km.2, 08348 Cabrils, Barcelona, Spain
                Author notes
                Article
                95982 0946
                10.1127/entomologia/2020/0946
                Copyright © 2020 E. Schweizerbart’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, 70176 Stuttgart, Germany
                Page count
                Figures: 5, Pages: 12
                Product
                Custom metadata
                1
                research_paper

                Comments

                Comment on this article