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      Human toxocariasis.

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          Abstract

          Parasitic nematodes of the genus Toxocara are socioeconomically important zoonotic pathogens. These parasites are usually directly transmitted to the human host via the faecal-oral route and can cause toxocariasis and associated complications, including allergic and neurological disorders. Although tens of millions of people are estimated to be exposed to or infected with Toxocara spp, global epidemiological information on the relationship between seropositivity and toxocariasis is limited. Recent findings suggest that the effect of toxocariasis on human health is increasing in some countries. Here we review the salient background on Toxocara and biology, summarise key aspects of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of toxocariasis, describe what is known about its geographic distribution and prevalence, and make some recommendations for future research towards the prevention and control of this important disease.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Lancet Infect Dis
          The Lancet. Infectious diseases
          Elsevier BV
          1474-4457
          1473-3099
          Jan 2018
          : 18
          : 1
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Melbourne Veterinary School, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia.
          [2 ] Department of Zoology, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
          [3 ] Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD, Australia.
          [4 ] Department of Molecular Parasitology and Tropical Diseases, School of Medicine & Research Center of International Tropical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.
          [5 ] Wellcome Centre for Molecular Parasitology, Institute for Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
          [6 ] Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development, National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; Department of Pediatrics, National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; Department of Molecular Virology & Microbiology, National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
          [7 ] Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Melbourne Veterinary School, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: robinbg@unimelb.edu.au.
          Article
          S1473-3099(17)30331-6
          10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30331-6
          28781085
          ab9f24b4-8391-4fec-bcdc-61da7f536d2a
          History

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