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      Effect of Aspirin on Disability-free Survival in the Healthy Elderly

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          Abstract

          Information on the use of aspirin to increase healthy independent life span in older persons is limited. Whether 5 years of daily low-dose aspirin therapy would extend disability-free life in healthy seniors is unclear.

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          Most cited references22

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          Assessing self-maintenance: activities of daily living, mobility, and instrumental activities of daily living.

          S. Katz (1983)
          The aging of the population of the United States and a concern for the well-being of older people have hastened the emergence of measures of functional health. Among these, measures of basic activities of daily living, mobility, and instrumental activities of daily living have been particularly useful and are now widely available. Many are defined in similar terms and are built into available comprehensive instruments. Although studies of reliability and validity continue to be needed, especially of predictive validity, there is documented evidence that these measures of self-maintaining function can be reliably used in clinical evaluations as well as in program evaluations and in planning. Current scientific evidence indicates that evaluation by these measures helps to identify problems that require treatment or care. Such evaluation also produces useful information about prognosis and is important in monitoring the health and illness of elderly people.
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            Cardiovascular Health in African Americans: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

            Population-wide reductions in cardiovascular disease incidence and mortality have not been shared equally by African Americans. The burden of cardiovascular disease in the African American community remains high and is a primary cause of disparities in life expectancy between African Americans and whites. The objectives of the present scientific statement are to describe cardiovascular health in African Americans and to highlight unique considerations for disease prevention and management.
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              A randomized trial of low-dose aspirin in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in women.

              Randomized trials have shown that low-dose aspirin decreases the risk of a first myocardial infarction in men, with little effect on the risk of ischemic stroke. There are few similar data in women. We randomly assigned 39,876 initially healthy women 45 years of age or older to receive 100 mg of aspirin on alternate days or placebo and then monitored them for 10 years for a first major cardiovascular event (i.e., nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes). During follow-up, 477 major cardiovascular events were confirmed in the aspirin group, as compared with 522 in the placebo group, for a nonsignificant reduction in risk with aspirin of 9 percent (relative risk, 0.91; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.80 to 1.03; P=0.13). With regard to individual end points, there was a 17 percent reduction in the risk of stroke in the aspirin group, as compared with the placebo group (relative risk, 0.83; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.69 to 0.99; P=0.04), owing to a 24 percent reduction in the risk of ischemic stroke (relative risk, 0.76; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.63 to 0.93; P=0.009) and a nonsignificant increase in the risk of hemorrhagic stroke (relative risk, 1.24; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.87; P=0.31). As compared with placebo, aspirin had no significant effect on the risk of fatal or nonfatal myocardial infarction (relative risk, 1.02; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.84 to 1.25; P=0.83) or death from cardiovascular causes (relative risk, 0.95; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.74 to 1.22; P=0.68). Gastrointestinal bleeding requiring transfusion was more frequent in the aspirin group than in the placebo group (relative risk, 1.40; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.83; P=0.02). Subgroup analyses showed that aspirin significantly reduced the risk of major cardiovascular events, ischemic stroke, and myocardial infarction among women 65 years of age or older. In this large, primary-prevention trial among women, aspirin lowered the risk of stroke without affecting the risk of myocardial infarction or death from cardiovascular causes, leading to a nonsignificant finding with respect to the primary end point. Copyright 2005 Massachusetts Medical Society.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                New England Journal of Medicine
                N Engl J Med
                New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM/MMS)
                0028-4793
                1533-4406
                September 16 2018
                September 16 2018
                Affiliations
                [1 ]From the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University (J.J.M., R.L.W., M.R.N., C.M.R., R.W., E.S., J.E.L., A.M.T., S.M.F., S.G.O., R.E.T., C.I.J., J.R.), the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research (P.G.), and the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute (C.I.J.), Melbourne, and the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville (G.A.D.), VIC, Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart (M.R.N.), the School...
                Article
                10.1056/NEJMoa1800722
                6426126
                30221596
                abd8640d-e84c-45d2-bc54-0a547d4d0822
                © 2018

                http://www.nejmgroup.org/legal/terms-of-use.htm

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