4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Lactic Acid Bacteria as Antibacterial Agents to Extend the Shelf Life of Fresh and Minimally Processed Fruits and Vegetables: Quality and Safety Aspects

      review-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Eating fresh fruits and vegetables is, undoubtedly, a healthy habit that should be adopted by everyone (particularly due to the nutrients and functional properties of fruits and vegetables). However, at the same time, due to their production in the external environment, there is an increased risk of their being infected with various pathogenic microorganisms, some of which cause serious foodborne illnesses. In order to preserve and distribute safe, raw, and minimally processed fruits and vegetables, many strategies have been proposed, including bioprotection. The use of lactic acid bacteria in raw and minimally processed fruits and vegetables helps to better maintain their quality by extending their shelf life, causing a significant reduction and inhibition of the action of important foodborne pathogens. The antibacterial effect of lactic acid bacteria is attributed to its ability to produce antimicrobial compounds, including bacteriocins, with strong competitive action against many microorganisms. The use of bacteriocins, both separately and in combination with edible coatings, is considered a very promising approach for microbiological quality, and safety for postharvest storage of raw and minimally processed fruits and vegetables. Therefore, the purpose of the review is to discuss the biopreservation of fresh fruits and vegetables through the use of lactic acid bacteria as a green and safe technique.

          Related collections

          Most cited references159

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Genetics of bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria.

          Lactic acid bacteria produce a variety of bacteriocins that have recently come under detailed investigation. The biochemical and genetic characteristics of these antimicrobial proteins are reviewed and common elements are discussed between the different classes of bacteriocins produced by these Gram-positive bacteria.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria: extending the family

            Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) constitute a heterogeneous group of microorganisms that produce lactic acid as the major product during the fermentation process. LAB are Gram-positive bacteria with great biotechnological potential in the food industry. They can produce bacteriocins, which are proteinaceous antimicrobial molecules with a diverse genetic origin, posttranslationally modified or not, that can help the producer organism to outcompete other bacterial species. In this review, we focus on the various types of bacteriocins that can be found in LAB and the organization and regulation of the gene clusters responsible for their production and biosynthesis, and consider the food applications of the prototype bacteriocins from LAB. Furthermore, we propose a revised classification of bacteriocins that can accommodate the increasing number of classes reported over the last years. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00253-016-7343-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Bacteriocin-based strategies for food biopreservation.

              Bacteriocins are ribosomally-synthesized peptides or proteins with antimicrobial activity, produced by different groups of bacteria. Many lactic acid bacteria (LAB) produce bacteriocins with rather broad spectra of inhibition. Several LAB bacteriocins offer potential applications in food preservation, and the use of bacteriocins in the food industry can help to reduce the addition of chemical preservatives as well as the intensity of heat treatments, resulting in foods which are more naturally preserved and richer in organoleptic and nutritional properties. This can be an alternative to satisfy the increasing consumers demands for safe, fresh-tasting, ready-to-eat, minimally-processed foods and also to develop "novel" food products (e.g. less acidic, or with a lower salt content). In addition to the available commercial preparations of nisin and pediocin PA-1/AcH, other bacteriocins (like for example lacticin 3147, enterocin AS-48 or variacin) also offer promising perspectives. Broad-spectrum bacteriocins present potential wider uses, while narrow-spectrum bacteriocins can be used more specifically to selectively inhibit certain high-risk bacteria in foods like Listeria monocytogenes without affecting harmless microbiota. Bacteriocins can be added to foods in the form of concentrated preparations as food preservatives, shelf-life extenders, additives or ingredients, or they can be produced in situ by bacteriocinogenic starters, adjunct or protective cultures. Immobilized bacteriocins can also find application for development of bioactive food packaging. In recent years, application of bacteriocins as part of hurdle technology has gained great attention. Several bacteriocins show additive or synergistic effects when used in combination with other antimicrobial agents, including chemical preservatives, natural phenolic compounds, as well as other antimicrobial proteins. This, as well as the combined use of different bacteriocins may also be an attractive approach to avoid development of resistant strains. The combination of bacteriocins and physical treatments like high pressure processing or pulsed electric fields also offer good opportunities for more effective preservation of foods, providing an additional barrier to more refractile forms like bacterial endospores as well. The effectiveness of bacteriocins is often dictated by environmental factors like pH, temperature, food composition and structure, as well as the food microbiota. Foods must be considered as complex ecosystems in which microbial interactions may have a great influence on the microbial balance and proliferation of beneficial or harmful bacteria. Recent developments in molecular microbial ecology can help to better understand the global effects of bacteriocins in food ecosystems, and the study of bacterial genomes may reveal new sources of bacteriocins.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Microorganisms
                Microorganisms
                microorganisms
                Microorganisms
                MDPI
                2076-2607
                24 June 2020
                June 2020
                : 8
                : 6
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Food Science and Technology, University of the Peloponnese, Antikalamos, 24100 Kalamata, Greece; sagriopoulou@ 123456gmail.com (S.A.); estamatel@ 123456gmail.com (E.S.)
                [2 ]Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Food Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, 20950 Lublin, Poland; monika.sachadyn-krol@ 123456up.lublin.pl
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: theovarzakas@ 123456yahoo.gr ; Tel.: +30-27210-45279
                Article
                microorganisms-08-00952
                10.3390/microorganisms8060952
                7356186
                32599824
                ac10ffb9-64d1-4cb9-bcb3-f5d8778d4251
                © 2020 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                Categories
                Review

                lactic acid bacteria,biopreservation,edible coatings and films,fresh-cut fruits and vegetables,shelf life extension,food quality,microbiological quality,postharvest,storage,bacteriocins

                Comments

                Comment on this article