0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Movement distances for four small mammals in two Atlantic forests fragments, Southern Brazil

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Animal movement has an important role in individual performance, species reproduction, population demography, and conservation, especially in fragmented landscapes. The distance moved by an individual may vary depending on individual needs, such as the search for food resources and sexual partners. Here we investigated which factors affect the distances between successive captures (hereafter DSC) for Akodon montensis, Oligoryzomys nigripes, Sooretamys angouya, and Didelphis albiventris. This study was conducted from April 2015 to October 2016 in two fragments in the south of Atlantic Forest biome through capture, mark and recapture technique. DSC was analyzed using Generalized Linear Models with Poisson distribution where the independent variables were sex, whether the animal was active or not in terms of reproduction, body weight, and climatic season. The mean DSC was greater for D. albiventris (44.6 ± 28.8 m), followed by S. angouya (31.9 ± 25.7 m), O. nigripes (25.8 ± 22.5 m) and A. montensis (18.9 ± 22.0 m). Males of all species moved larger DSC than females. Considering the rodents, reproductive animals also moved larger DSC than non-reproductive animals. Sex may have masked the effect of body weight, as males tend to be larger than females. Climatic effects were tested for A. montensis and O. nigripes, however, with diverse effects.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 18

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Updated world map of the Köppen-Geiger climate classification

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The ecology of territoriality in small mammals.

            Recent research on space use and social behavior of small mammals has revealed pronounced differences in the degree of territoriality between species and between sexes within species. Hypotheses to explain these differences have been based on optimality approaches. Leading hypotheses are that the spatial distribution, abundance and renewal rates of food resources determine whether females defend territories, and that the spatial and temporal pattern of availability of females determines whether males are territorial. Other hypotheses invoke resources other than food, or maintain that territoriality in females deters infanticide. This review briefly summarizes these hypotheses and evaluates recently collected evidence from comparative and experimental studies. Copyright © 1990. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Rigorous home range estimation with movement data: a new autocorrelated kernel density estimator.

              Quantifying animals' home ranges is a key problem in ecology and has important conservation and wildlife management applications. Kernel density estimation (KDE) is a workhorse technique for range delineation problems that is both statistically efficient and nonparametric. KDE assumes that the data are independent and identically distributed (IID). However, animal tracking data, which are routinely used as inputs to KDEs, are inherently autocorrelated and violate this key assumption. As we demonstrate, using realistically autocorrelated data in conventional KDEs results in grossly underestimated home ranges. We further show that the performance of conventional KDEs actually degrades as data quality improves, because autocorrelation strength increases as movement paths become more finely resolved. To remedy these flaws with the traditional KDE method, we derive an autocorrelated KDE (AKDE) from first principles to use autocorrelated data, making it perfectly suited for movement data sets. We illustrate the vastly improved performance of AKDE using analytical arguments, relocation data from Mongolian gazelles, and simulations based upon the gazelle's observed movement process. By yielding better minimum area estimates for threatened wildlife populations, we believe that future widespread use of AKDE will have significant impact on ecology and conservation biology.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Neotropical Biology and Conservation
                NBC
                Pensoft Publishers
                2236-3777
                January 14 2021
                January 14 2021
                : 16
                : 1
                : 11-18
                Article
                10.3897/neotropical.16.e59669
                © 2021

                Comments

                Comment on this article