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      Occurrence and Timing of Subsequent SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR Positivity Among Initially Negative Patients

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          Abstract

          Using data for 20,912 patients from two large academic health systems, we analyzed the frequency of SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR test-discordance among individuals initially testing negative by nasopharyngeal swab who were retested on clinical grounds within 7 days. The frequency of subsequent positivity within this window was 3.5% and similar across institutions.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Clin Infect Dis
          Clin. Infect. Dis
          cid
          Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
          Oxford University Press (US )
          1058-4838
          1537-6591
          07 June 2020
          Affiliations
          [1 ] University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA
          [2 ] Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
          [3 ] Clinical Virology Laboratory, Stanford Health Care, Stanford, CA, USA
          [4 ] University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA
          [5 ] Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Seattle, WA, USA
          [6 ] University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA
          [7 ] University of Washington School of Medicine, Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Seattle, WA, USA
          [8 ] Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA
          [9 ] Center for Biomedical Informatics Research, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
          [10 ] University of Washington School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Seattle, WA, USA
          Author notes
          Corresponding author: Benjamin A. Pinsky, MD, PhD ( bpinsky@ 123456stanford.edu ) | 3375 Hillview, Room 2913, Palo Alto, CA 94304; Phone: (650) 498-5575; Fax (650) 736-1964

          contributed equally to this manuscript

          Article
          ciaa722
          10.1093/cid/ciaa722
          7314163
          32506118
          Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2020. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

          This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

          This article is made available via the PMC Open Access Subset for unrestricted re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic or until permissions are revoked in writing. Upon expiration of these permissions, PMC is granted a perpetual license to make this article available via PMC and Europe PMC, consistent with existing copyright protections.

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          Brief Report
          AcademicSubjects/MED00290
          Custom metadata
          PAP
          accepted-manuscript

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