0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Occupational Safety Precautions among Nurses at Four Hospitals, Nablus District, Palestine

      brief-report

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Occupational hazards, exposure to blood and body fluids (BBF) accidents and safety precautions constitute an important public health issue. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of exposure to occupational hazards among nurses, and their knowledge of occupational safety precautions. In a cross-sectional study, we surveyed 332 nurses working in 4 hospitals, Nablus, West Bank, Palestine, by a questionnaire. Bivariate analysis tested the associations between ever exposure and the high likelihood of BBF exposure and the independent socio-demographic and occupational variables. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to assess the associations between the same two exposures and selected independent variables (those significant in the bivariate analysis). Prevalence of ever exposure to BBF was 51.7%, and was associated with working in private and charitable hospitals (OR 2.62, 2.68, respectively), having 4–6 family members (OR 0.52) and "nursing" being as one's top career choice at university (OR 0.48). The prevalence of high likelihood of BBF exposure was 62.2%, and was associated with working in charitable and private hospitals (OR 7.81, 2.43, respectively) and "nursing" being as one's top career choice (OR 0.57). Regarding knowledge, most respondents believed it is necessary to enact laws and regulations regarding occupational safety precautions, reported the use of sharps containers, immediate disinfection after an accident, reporting an accident, and using personal protective equipment. Nurses had adequate knowledge of the risks of their hospital work. Nevertheless, they exhibited high prevalence of exposure to BBF accidents. Future studies are needed to re-evaluate existing occupational safety guidelines in hospitals, establish monitoring and evaluation protocols for health care workers' adherence to the guidelines, and institute well-defined policies for reporting occupational injury incidents so these can be handled appropriately.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 4

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Nurses' knowledge of and compliance with universal precautions in an acute care hospital.

          A cross-sectional survey was conducted to investigate the nurses' knowledge of and compliance with Universal Precautions (UP) in an acute hospital in Hong Kong. A total of 450 nurses were randomly selected from a population of acute care nurses and 306 were successfully recruited in the study. The study revealed that the nurses' knowledge of UP was inadequate. In addition, UP was not only insufficiently and inappropriately applied, but also selectively practiced. Nearly all respondents knew that used needles should be disposed of in a sharps' box after injections. However, nurses had difficulty in distinguishing between deep body fluids and other general body secretions that are not considered infectious in UP. A high compliance was reported regarding hand-washing, disposal of needles and glove usage. However, the use of other protective wear such as masks and goggles was uncommon. The results also showed no significant relationships between the nurses' knowledge and compliance with UP. It is recommended that UP educational programmes need to consider attitudes in conjunction with empirical knowledge. Nurse managers and occupational health nurses should take a leadership role to ensure safe practices are used in the care of patients.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            An audit of Ear, Nose and Throat diseases in a tertiary health institution in South-western Nigeria

            Introduction This study is aimed at determining the pattern of ear, nose and throat diseases and their relationship with socio-demographic factors with auditing intent in a tertiary hospital in South-western Nigeria. Methods Medical records of patients managed at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria from 2006 to 2010 were reviewed for all essential clinical data. Results There were 2641 (52.8%) males and 2360 (47.2%) females. Two thousand and fifty (41%) patients had age ≤15years old. Sixty three percent of the patients were Christians, 37% were Muslims and less than 1% had other religions. There were more patients in lower occupational classes than those in the upper classes. The average number of patients with ear, nose and throat diseases managed per month was eighty three. Patients with ear diseases were 3136 (62.7%), the nose diseases were 1153 (23.0%), the throat diseases were 479 (9.6%) and head/neck diseases were 233 (4.7%). Conclusion This study showed that otitis media, obstructive adenoid, foreign bodies in the ear and throat infections were the common ear, nose, throat disorders seen in patients aged ≤15years whereas, hearing loss, rhinosinusitis and tumors were the common disorders of ear, nose and throat seen in patients aged 16 years and above. Although these disorders are not yet considered to be of public health importance, they contribute significantly to the existing burden of health problems in our environment. Therefore, there is a need for improved public awareness on ear, nose and throat diseases.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Needle-Stick Injury among Health Care Workers in Hemodialysis Units in Nigeria: A Multi-Center Study

              Background: Needle-stick and sharps injuries carry the risk of infection and are occupational hazards for all health care professionals involved in clinical care. Objective: To determine the frequency and factors contributing to needle-stick injury (NSI) among health care workers of dialysis units in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods: Data were obtained by anonymous, self-reporting questionnaire from staff of 4 hemodialysis units between October and December 2011. Information on demographics, job category and duration, details of NSI in the past, kind of activity and procedure under which the NSI occurred, if injury was reported, vaccination status of staff, and post-exposure treatment received were obtained. Results: The study population included 38 (37.3%) doctors, 42 nurses (41.2%), 14 (13.7%) dialysis technicians and 8 (7.8%) ancillary staff. There were 39 (38.2%) males. The mean±SD age of the study population was 34.4±8.3 years. 25 (24.5%) staff had suffered NSI in the last 12 months and 41 (40.2%) in their entire working career. The most common activity leading to NSI was recapping of needles (45%), improper disposal of needles (30%), and venous cannulation and setting of drips (27.5%). NSI was significantly (p=0.016) higher among those with work experience between 6 and 10 years than others. Hollow bore needles were responsible for 82.9% of the NSIs. Only 15 (37%) respondents reported their NSI to their unit head or designated officer in order to get medical advice. Conclusion: In Lagos, Nigeria, NSI is common among hemodialysis staff and is underreported. Many NSIs can be prevented by adhering to the practice of universal precautions as well as education of staff on such precautionary methods.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Occup Environ Med
                Int J Occup Environ Med
                Int J Occup Environ Med
                IJOEM
                The International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
                Shiraz: NIOC Health Organization
                2008-6520
                2008-6814
                October 2015
                01 October 2015
                : 6
                : 4
                : 243-246
                Affiliations
                1Institute of Community and Public Health, Birzeit University, West Bank, Palestine
                2Institute of Environmental and Water Studies, Birzeit University, West Bank, Palestine
                3Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of Gloucestershire, Oxstalls Campus, Oxstalls Lane, Gloucester GL2 9HW, UK
                4Faculty of Graduate Studies, Birzeit University, West Bank, Palestine
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence to Issam Ahmad Al-Khatib, PhD, Institute of Environmental and Water Studies, Birzeit University, PO Box 14, Birzeit, West Bank, Palestine. Fax: +972-2298-2120 E-mail: ikhatib2012@ 123456yahoo.com
                Article
                10.15171/ijoem.2015.581
                6977042
                26498052
                acbe79d0-8480-49f4-9390-4a54b990c152

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

                Page count
                Tables: 1, References: 6, Pages: 4
                Product
                Categories
                Brief Report

                Comments

                Comment on this article