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      Patterns of use of medications, herbal products and nutritional supplements and polypharmacy associating factors in Palestinian geriatric patients

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      European Geriatric Medicine

      Elsevier BV

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          Most cited references 34

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          Use of medications and polypharmacy are increasing among the elderly.

          To assess changes in medicine use and polypharmacy, two cross-sectional surveys were carried out among community-dwelling persons aged 64 years or over in 1990-91 (n = 1,131) and 1998-99 (n = 1,197) in the municipality of Lieto in southwestern Finland. In addition to drug use, the questionnaire included items on social background, quality of life, and home nursing services. Among those surveyed, 78% in 1990-1991 and 88% in 1998-1999 (P =.001) used prescription drugs during 7 days prior to the interview. The most commonly used medications were for the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. The number of medications per person increased from 3.1 (SD 2.8) to 3.8 (SD 3.1) (P =.0001), and polypharmacy (concominant use of over five medications) increased from 19 to 25% (P =.006). These changes were most prominent among persons aged 85 years or over, especially among women. Polypharmacy is a complex and worrying phenomenon that merits more research.
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            Polypharmacy in the elderly: A literature review

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              Polypharmacy, length of hospital stay, and in-hospital mortality among elderly patients in internal medicine wards. The REPOSI study.

              We evaluated the prevalence and factors associated with polypharmacy and investigated the role of polypharmacy as a predictor of length of hospital stay and in-hospital mortality. Thirty-eight internal medicine wards in Italy participated in the Registro Politerapie SIMI (REPOSI) study during 2008. One thousand three hundred and thirty-two in-patients aged ≥65 years were enrolled. Polypharmacy was defined as the concomitant use of five or more medications. Linear regression analyses were used to evaluate predictors of length of hospital stay and logistic regression models for predictors of in-hospital mortality. Age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index, polypharmacy, and number of in-hospital clinical adverse events (AEs) were used as possible confounders. The prevalence of polypharmacy was 51.9% at hospital admission and 67.0% at discharge. Age, number of drugs at admission, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were independently associated with polypharmacy at discharge. In multivariate analysis, the occurrence of at least one AE while in hospital was the only predictor of prolonged hospitalization (each new AE prolonged hospital stay by 3.57 days, p < 0.0001). Age [odds ratio (OR) 1.04; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.08; p = 0.02), comorbidities (OR 1.18; 95% CI 1.12-1.24; p < 0.0001), and AEs (OR 6.80; 95% CI 3.58-12.9; p < 0.0001) were significantly associated with in-hospital mortality. Although most elderly in-patients receive polypharmacy, in this study, it was not associated with any hospital outcome. However, AEs were strongly correlated with a longer hospital stay and higher mortality risk.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                European Geriatric Medicine
                European Geriatric Medicine
                Elsevier BV
                18787649
                June 2014
                June 2014
                : 5
                : 3
                : 188-194
                Article
                10.1016/j.eurger.2013.11.004
                © 2014

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