Blog
About

16
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Iatrogenic Kaposi's sarcoma caused by corticosteroids*

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 12

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Identification of herpesvirus-like DNA sequences in AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma.

          Representational difference analysis was used to isolate unique sequences present in more than 90 percent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) tissues obtained from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These sequences were not present in tissue DNA from non-AIDS patients, but were present in 15 percent of non-KS tissue DNA samples from AIDS patients. The sequences are homologous to, but distinct from, capsid and tegument protein genes of the Gammaherpesvirinae, herpesvirus saimiri and Epstein-Barr virus. These KS-associated herpesvirus-like (KSHV) sequences appear to define a new human herpesvirus.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Identification of herpesvirus-like DNA sequences in AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Kaposi sarcoma.

              Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a low-grade vascular tumor associated with Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8 (KSHV/HHV8) infection. Kaposi sarcoma lesions predominantly present at mucocutaneous sites, but may involve all organs and anatomic locations. Recognized epidemiologic-clinical forms of KS include classic, African (endemic), AIDS-associated (epidemic), and iatrogenic KS. New clinical manifestations have been described, such as antiretroviral therapy-related KS regression or flares. Kaposi sarcoma lesions evolve from early (patch stage) macules into plaques (plaque stage) that grow into larger nodules (tumor stage). Newer histologic variants include anaplastic, hyperkeratotic, lymphangioma-like, bullous, telangiectatic, ecchymotic, keloidal, pyogenic granuloma-like, micronodular, intravascular, glomeruloid and pigmented KS, as well as KS with sarcoidlike granulomas and KS with myoid nodules. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (HHV8) is the most specific immunohistochemical marker available to help distinguish KS from its mimics. Since KS remains one of the most common AIDS-defining malignancies, it is important that pathologists be able to recognize KS and its contemporary manifestations.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                [1 ]Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo – São Paulo (SP), Brazil
                Author notes
                Mailing address: Andressa Sato de Aquino Lopes, R. Dr Cesário Mota Jr., 112 Vila Buarque, 01221-020 - São Paulo - SP Brazil, E-mail: dressa_sato@ 123456hotmail.com
                Journal
                An Bras Dermatol
                An Bras Dermatol
                abd
                Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia
                Sociedade Brasileira de Dermatologia
                0365-0596
                1806-4841
                Nov-Dec 2016
                Nov-Dec 2016
                : 91
                : 6
                : 867-869
                5193216 10.1590/abd1806-4841.20165772

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Letters

                Comments

                Comment on this article