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      A comparison of a modified sequential oral sensory approach to an applied behavior-analytic approach in the treatment of food selectivity in children with autism spectrum disorder : M-SOS TREATMENT

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          High Glycemic Index Foods, Overeating, and Obesity

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            A comparison of eating behaviors between children with and without autism.

            Although clinicians typically assume that feeding problems co-exist with a diagnosis of autism, no previous research has compared the eating behavior of children with autism to typically developing children. This study compared caregiver report of eating problems of children with and without autism on a standardized questionnaire. The questionnaire included items pertaining to food refusal and acceptance patterns as well as food presentation requirements. Caregivers were also asked to complete a food inventory that indicated the number of foods eaten within each food group for both the child and the family. Results indicated children with autism have significantly more feeding problems and eat a significantly narrower range of foods than children without autism.
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              Food preferences and factors influencing food selectivity for children with autism spectrum disorders.

              Although clinicians and parents widely accept that children with autism spectrum disorder exhibit more feeding problems than their typically developing peers, little information is available concerning the characteristic food items accepted by these children or the possible factors contributing to these feeding problems. This article used an informant-based questionnaire to survey parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (N=138) to determine: (a) the types of feeding problems their children typically exhibit, (b) the food items their children prefer, (c) the relationship of feeding problems to family eating preferences, and (d) the relationship of the diagnostic characteristics of autism to feeding behavior. Results indicated that the children preferred fewer types of food items within groups than their families; however, family food preferences appeared to influence food selection more than the diagnostic characteristics of autism.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis
                Jnl of Applied Behav Analysis
                Wiley
                00218855
                September 2016
                September 2016
                July 23 2016
                : 49
                : 3
                : 485-511
                Affiliations
                [1 ]University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute
                Article
                10.1002/jaba.332
                ad19d65a-74bf-4f28-bec7-5c66551f1c1d
                © 2016

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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                Self URI (article page): http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jaba.332

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