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      Impact of Facility- and Community-Based Peer Support Models on Maternal Uptake and Retention in Malawi's Option B+ HIV Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission Program: A 3-Arm Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial (PURE Malawi).

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          Abstract

          Many sub-Saharan African countries have adopted Option B+, a prevention of mother-to-child transmission approach providing HIV-infected pregnant and lactating women with immediate lifelong antiretroviral therapy. High maternal attrition has been observed in Option B+. Peer-based support may improve retention.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
          Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
          Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
          1944-7884
          1525-4135
          Jun 01 2017
          : 75 Suppl 2
          Affiliations
          [1 ] *Lighthouse Trust, Lilongwe, Malawi; †Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC; ‡Department of Public Health, College of Medicine, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Malawi, Malawi; §The International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Center for Operational Research, Paris, France; ‖Research Department, Dignitas International, Zomba, Malawi; ¶Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Tornoto, Canada; #University of North Carolina Project, Lilongwe, Malawi; **Malaria Alert Centre, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi; ††International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH), University of Washington, Lilongwe, Malawi; ‡‡mothers2mothers, Lilongwe, Malawi; §§Management Sciences for Health, Lilongwe, Malawi; ‖‖Department of Economics, University of Malawi, Chancellor College, Zomba, Malawi; and ¶¶Department of HIV and AIDS, Ministry of Health, Lilongwe, Malawi.
          Article
          00126334-201706011-00006
          10.1097/QAI.0000000000001357
          28498183

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