0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      ENVIRONMENTAL RELATIVE BURDEN INDEX: A STREAMLINED LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT METHOD FOR FACILITIES POLLUTION PREVENTION

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          This paper describes a new semi-quantitative streamlined life cycle assessment (SLCA) method, the Environmental Relative Burden Index (ERBI), for describing and ranking the relative environmental burdens associated with facility operations and maintenance options. The long-range goal is for this ERBI method to serve as a pollution-prevention decision support tool for facilities managers, when faced with competing operations and maintenance alternatives. The specific application presented in this paper evaluates asbestos-containing materials (ACM) and lead-based paint (LBP) management options in public school facilities. The ERBI methodology is adapted from previous streamlined semi-quantitative LCA methodologies and is described in detail. The ERBI is then employed to evaluate the relative environmental impacts of six management strategies for these hazardous building materials: management in-situ, encapsulation/containment, and full abatement/disposal, for both ACM and LBP. SLCA goal definition, system boundaries, ERBI matrix, and overall ERBI Ratings (RERB) for each material management strategy are presented. The ERBI can be a useful tool in prioritizing building maintenance alternatives, especially in cases where detailed quantitative data are unavailable.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 10

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Lead Exposures in U.S. Children, 2008: Implications for Prevention

          Objective We reviewed the sources of lead in the environments of U.S. children, contributions to children’s blood lead levels, source elimination and control efforts, and existing federal authorities. Our context is the U.S. public health goal to eliminate pediatric elevated blood lead levels (EBLs) by 2010. Data sources National, state, and local exposure assessments over the past half century have identified risk factors for EBLs among U.S. children, including age, race, income, age and location of housing, parental occupation, and season. Data extraction and synthesis Recent national policies have greatly reduced lead exposure among U.S. children, but even very low exposure levels compromise children’s later intellectual development and lifetime achievement. No threshold for these effects has been demonstrated. Although lead paint and dust may still account for up to 70% of EBLs in U.S. children, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that ≥30% of current EBLs do not have an immediate lead paint source, and numerous studies indicate that lead exposures result from multiple sources. EBLs and even deaths have been associated with inadequately controlled sources including ethnic remedies and goods, consumer products, and food-related items such as ceramics. Lead in public drinking water and in older urban centers remain exposure sources in many areas. Conclusions Achieving the 2010 goal requires maintaining current efforts, especially programs addressing lead paint, while developing interventions that prevent exposure before children are poisoned. It also requires active collaboration across all levels of government to identify and control all potential sources of lead exposure, as well as primary prevention.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Evaluation of two simplified Life Cycle assessment methods

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Case studies examining LCA streamlining techniques

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1552-6100
                1943-4618
                1943-4618
                Winter 2016
                : 11
                : 1
                : 95-107
                Author notes

                1. Associate Professor, Myers-Lawson School of Construction and Via Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech, debdickerson@ 123456vt.edu , 310B Bishop-Favrao Hall, Blacksburg, VA 24061

                Article
                jgb.11.1.95
                10.3992/jgb.11.1.95.1
                ©2016 by College Publishing. All rights reserved.
                Page count
                Pages: 13
                Product
                Categories
                RESEARCH

                Comments

                Comment on this article