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      Deliberation for Reconciliation in Divided Societies

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      Journal of Deliberative Democracy
      University of Westminster Press

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          Abstract

          Engaging with the literature on deliberative democracy, this article contends that in the context of ethnic group hostilities, deliberative processes where participants have a genuine opportunity to communicate and ‘hear the other side’ can be a way for inter-group dialogue and reconciliation. Separating the deliberative process into three distinct moments, it offers a framework for understanding how unequal and conflicting parties may be brought together to deliberate, how to grasp the micro-politics of deliberation, and to understand the diffusion mechanisms that bring society back in. The approach we propose aims to bridge the normative-macro and the experimental-micro accounts of deliberation in order to focus on non-ideal real-life contexts and to offer ‘deliberative lenses’ to study the (rare) cases of deliberative inter-ethnic reconciliation. The approach and the three moments are illustrated by the deliberative turn taken to resolve a conflict between the Innu communities, the Quebec government and the local non-Innu in Saguenay-Lac-Saint Jean.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Journal of Deliberative Democracy
          University of Westminster Press
          2634-0488
          May 12 2015
          May 1 2020
          : 11
          : 1
          Article
          10.16997/jdd.226
          ad9aeac3-7e8a-4f23-9d33-bd5257d56863
          © 2020

          https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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