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      Ly-6Chigh monocytes depend on Nr4a1 to balance both inflammatory and reparative phases in the infarcted myocardium.

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          Abstract

          Healing after myocardial infarction involves the biphasic accumulation of inflammatory lymphocyte antigen 6C (Ly-6C)(high) and reparative Ly-6C(low) monocytes/macrophages (Mo/MΦ). According to 1 model, Mo/MΦ heterogeneity in the heart originates in the blood and involves the sequential recruitment of distinct monocyte subsets that differentiate to distinct macrophages. Alternatively, heterogeneity may arise in tissue from 1 circulating subset via local macrophage differentiation and polarization. The orphan nuclear hormone receptor, nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group a, member 1 (Nr4a1), is essential to Ly-6C(low) monocyte production but dispensable to Ly-6C(low) macrophage differentiation; dependence on Nr4a1 can thus discriminate between systemic and local origins of macrophage heterogeneity.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Circ. Res.
          Circulation research
          Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
          1524-4571
          0009-7330
          May 09 2014
          : 114
          : 10
          Affiliations
          [1 ] From the Center for Systems Biology (I.H., L.M.S.G., C.W., B.G.C., Y.I., M.N., R.W., F.K.S.) and Department of Cardiology (T.C.T., M.S.-C.), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Infectious Diseases, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany (T.A.W.H.); Department of Medicine (R.L.) and Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine (P.L.), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA; Department of Cardiology and Angiology I, University Heart Center Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany (A.Z.); Division of Inflammation Biology, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, CA (C.C.H.); and Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (R.W.).
          Article
          CIRCRESAHA.114.303204 NIHMS575987
          10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.114.303204
          4017349
          24625784

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