Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      High-throughput prediction of disordered moonlighting regions in protein sequences.

      1 , 1 , 2

      Proteins

      Wiley

      human proteome, intrinsic disorder, moonlighting regions, prediction, protein function

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Intrinsically disordered regions lack stable structure in their native conformation but are nevertheless functional and highly abundant, particularly in Eukaryotes. Disordered moonlighting regions (DMRs) are intrinsically disordered regions that carry out multiple functions. DMRs are different from moonlighting proteins that could be structured and that are annotated at the whole-protein level. DMRs cannot be identified by current predictors of functions of disorder that focus on specific functions rather than multifunctional regions. We conceptualized, designed and empirically assessed first-of-its-kind sequence-based predictor of DMRs, DMRpred. This computational tool outputs propensity for being in a DMR for each residue in an input protein sequence. We developed novel amino acid indices that quantify propensities for functions relevant to DMRs and used evolutionary conservation, putative solvent accessibility and intrinsic disorder derived from the input sequence to build a rich profile that is suitable to accurately predict DMRs. We processed this profile to derive innovative features that we input into a Random Forest model to generate the predictions. Empirical assessment shows that DMRpred generates accurate predictions with area under receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.86 and accuracy = 82%. These results are significantly better than the closest alternative approaches that rely on sequence alignment, evolutionary conservation and putative disorder and disorder functions. Analysis of abundance of putative DMRs in the human proteome reveals that as many as 25% of proteins may have long >30 residues) DMRs. A webserver implementation of DMRpred is available at http://biomine.cs.vcu.edu/servers/DMRpred/.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Proteins
          Proteins
          Wiley
          1097-0134
          0887-3585
          October 2018
          : 86
          : 10
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
          [2 ] Department of Computer Science, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA.
          Article
          10.1002/prot.25590
          30099775

          Comments

          Comment on this article