Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: not found

Making progress on the WHO Public Health Research Agenda for Influenza

1

Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses

John Wiley and Sons Inc.

Read this article at

ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 2

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Epidemic and intervention modelling--a scientific rationale for policy decisions? Lessons from the 2009 influenza pandemic.

      Outbreak analysis and mathematical modelling are crucial for planning public health responses to infectious disease outbreaks, epidemics and pandemics. This paper describes the data analysis and mathematical modelling undertaken during and following the 2009 influenza pandemic, especially to inform public health planning and decision-making. Soon after A(H1N1)pdm09 emerged in North America in 2009, the World Health Organization convened an informal mathematical modelling network of public health and academic experts and modelling groups. This network and other modelling groups worked with policy-makers to characterize the dynamics and impact of the pandemic and assess the effectiveness of interventions in different settings. The 2009 A(H1N1) influenza pandemic. Modellers provided a quantitative framework for analysing surveillance data and for understanding the dynamics of the epidemic and the impact of interventions. However, what most often informed policy decisions on a day-to-day basis was arguably not sophisticated simulation modelling, but rather, real-time statistical analyses based on mechanistic transmission models relying on available epidemiologic and virologic data. A key lesson was that modelling cannot substitute for data; it can only make use of available data and highlight what additional data might best inform policy. Data gaps in 2009, especially from low-resource countries, made it difficult to evaluate severity, the effects of seasonal variation on transmission and the effectiveness of non-pharmaceutical interventions. Better communication between modellers and public health practitioners is needed to manage expectations, facilitate data sharing and interpretation and reduce inconsistency in results.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        A review on the clinical spectrum and natural history of human influenza.

        The objective of this review is to provide updated information on the clinical spectrum and natural history of human influenza, including risk factors for severe disease, and to identify the knowledge gap in this area. We searched the MEDLINE database of the recent literature for the period January 2009 to August 17, 2011 with regard to the abovementioned aspects of human influenza, focusing on A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza. The clinical spectrum and outcomes of cases of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza have been mild and rather indistinguishable from those of seasonal influenza. Sporadic cases covering a wide range of neurological complications have been reported. Underlying predisposing conditions considered to be high-risk for A(H1N1)pdm09 infections are generally similar to those of seasonal influenza, but with two additional risk groups: pregnant women and the morbidly obese. Co-infections with bacteria and D222/N variants or 225G substitution of the viral genome have also been reported to be significant factors associated with the severity of disease. The current knowledge gap includes: (1) a lack of clarification regarding the relatively greater severity of the Mexican A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza outbreak in the early phase of the pandemic; (2) insufficient data on the clinical impact, risk factors, and outcomes of human infections caused by resistant strains of influenza; and (3) insufficient data from less developed countries that would enable them to prioritize strategies for influenza prevention and control. Clinical features and risk factors of A(H1N1)pdm09 are comparable to those of seasonal influenza. Emerging risk factors for severe disease with A(H1N1)pdm09 include morbid obesity, pregnancy, bacterial co-infections, and D222/N variants or 225G substitution of the viral genome. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
          Bookmark

          Author and article information

          Affiliations
          [ 1 ] Pandemic and Epidemic Diseases Department World Health Organization Geneva Switzerland
          Contributors
          shindon@who.int
          Journal
          Influenza Other Respir Viruses
          Influenza Other Respir Viruses
          10.1111/(ISSN)1750-2659
          IRV
          Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses
          John Wiley and Sons Inc. (Hoboken )
          1750-2640
          1750-2659
          September 2013
          27 August 2013
          : 7
          : Suppl Suppl 2 , Proceedings from the WHO Meeting on Global Research for Influenza. Guest Editor: Nahoko Shindo. Publication of this supplement was supported by the Government of Japan ( doiID: 10.1111/irv.2013.7.issue-s2 )
          : 1-3
          24034477 5909384 10.1111/irv.12149 IRV12149
          © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
          Counts
          Pages: 3
          Product
          Categories
          Editorial
          Proceedings from the WHO Meeting on Global Research for Influenza. Guest Editor: Nahoko Shindo. Publication of this supplement was supported by the Government of Japan
          Editorial
          Custom metadata
          2.0
          irv12149
          September 2013
          Converter:WILEY_ML3GV2_TO_NLMPMC version:version=5.3.4 mode:remove_FC converted:20.04.2018

          Infectious disease & Microbiology

          Comments

          Comment on this article