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      Cenozoic mass accumulation rates in the equatorial Pacific based on high-resolution mineralogy of Ocean Drilling Program Leg 199 : EQUATORIAL PACIFIC MASS ACCUMULATION

      1 , 1
      Paleoceanography
      American Geophysical Union (AGU)

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          High-resolution (104years) deep-sea foraminiferal stable isotope records of the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition

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            Late Cenozoic Eolian deposition in the North Pacific: Asian drying, Tibetan uplift, and cooling of the northern hemisphere

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              The Emperor Seamounts: southward motion of the Hawaiian hotspot plume in Earth's mantle.

              J. Tarduno (2003)
              The Hawaiian-Emperor hotspot track has a prominent bend, which has served as the basis for the theory that the Hawaiian hotspot, fixed in the deep mantle, traced a change in plate motion. However, paleomagnetic and radiometric age data from samples recovered by ocean drilling define an age-progressive paleolatitude history, indicating that the Emperor Seamount trend was principally formed by the rapid motion (over 40 millimeters per year) of the Hawaiian hotspot plume during Late Cretaceous to early-Tertiary times (81 to 47 million years ago). Evidence for motion of the Hawaiian plume affects models of mantle convection and plate tectonics, changing our understanding of terrestrial dynamics.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Paleoceanography
                Paleoceanography
                American Geophysical Union (AGU)
                08838305
                June 2004
                June 2004
                June 23 2004
                : 19
                : 2
                : n/a
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Geology and Geophysics; University of Utah; Salt Lake City Utah USA
                Article
                10.1029/2003PA000928
                ae482092-5320-4f7b-9cb4-7097f8cca8aa
                © 2004

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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