10
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Induction of labour in nulliparous and multiparous women: a UK, multicentre, open-label study of intravaginal misoprostol in comparison with dinoprostone

      , , ,
      BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
      Wiley

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references16

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Obesity in pregnancy.

          Overweight and obesity are common findings in women of reproductive age in the UK; as 32% of 35- to 64-year-old women are overweight and 21% obese. Obesity causes major changes in many features of maternal intermediary metabolism. Insulin resistance appears to be central to these changes and may also be involved in increased energy accumulation by the fetus. Maternal obesity is associated with many risks to the pregnancy, with increased risk of miscarriage (three-fold) and operative delivery (20.7 versus 33.8% in the obese and 47.4% in the morbidly obese group). Other risks to the mother include an increased risk of pre-eclampsia (3.9 versus 13.5% in the obese group) and thromboembolism (0.05 versus 0.12% in the obese group). There are risks to the fetus with increased perinatal mortality (1.4 per 1000 versus 5.7 per 1000 in the obese group) and macrosomia (>90th centile; 9 versus 17.5% in the obese group). Maternal obesity is associated with an increased risk of obesity in the long term. Obese woman should try to lose weight before pregnancy but probably not during pregnancy. There is no real evidence base for the management of maternal obesity but some practical suggestions are made.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Misoprostol for cervical ripening and labor induction: a meta-analysis.

            To analyze published randomized trials assessing the safety and efficacy of misoprostol for cervical ripening and labor induction. We supplemented a search of entries in electronic data bases with references cited in original studies and review articles to identify randomized trials of misoprostol for cervical ripening and labor induction. Two blinded investigators performed independent trial quality evaluation and data abstraction of randomized clinical trials assessing the efficacy of misoprostol as a cervical ripening and labor-inducing agent. We calculated an estimate of the odds ratio (OR) and risk difference for dichotomous outcomes, using both a random- and fixed-effects model. Continuous outcomes were pooled using a variance-weighted average of the within-study difference in means. Of 16 studies identified, eight met our criteria for meta-analysis. These eight trials included 966 patients (488 received misoprostol and 478 were controls). Women who received misoprostol for cervical ripening and labor induction had a significantly lower overall cesarean rate (OR 0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.48, 0.93) and a higher incidence of vaginal delivery within 24 hours of misoprostol application (OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.87, 3.71). Use of misoprostol was associated with a higher incidence of tachysystole (OR 2.70, 95% CI 1.80, 4.04) but not hyperstimulation (OR 1.91, 95% CI 0.98, 3.73). The incidences of abnormal 5-minute Apgar scores and admissions to the neonatal intensive care unit were similar in the misoprostol and control groups. The pooled estimate of the mean interval from start of induction to delivery was 4.6 hours fewer (95% CI -3.5, -5.7) in the misoprostol group. Published data confirm the safety and efficacy of intravaginal misoprostol as an agent for cervical ripening and labor induction.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Vaginal misoprostol for cervical ripening and induction of labour.

              Misoprostol (Cytotec, Searle) is a prostaglandin E1 analogue marketed for use in the prevention and treatment of peptic ulcer disease. It is inexpensive, easily stored at room temperature and has few systemic side effects. It is rapidly absorbed orally and vaginally. Although not registered for such use, misoprostol has been widely used for obstetric and gynaecological indications, such as induction of abortion and of labour. This is one of a series of reviews of methods of cervical ripening and labour induction using standardised methodology. To determine the effects of vaginal misoprostol for third trimester cervical ripening or induction of labour. The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register (October 2002), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 2002) and bibliographies of relevant papers. The criteria for inclusion included the following: (1) clinical trials comparing vaginal misoprostol used for third trimester cervical ripening or labour induction with placebo/no treatment or other methods listed above it on a predefined list of labour induction methods; (2) random allocation to the treatment or control group; (3) adequate allocation concealment; (4) violations of allocated management not sufficient to materially affect conclusions; (5) clinically meaningful outcome measures reported; (6) data available for analysis according to the random allocation; (7) missing data insufficient to materially affect the conclusions. A strategy was developed to deal with the large volume and complexity of trial data relating to labour induction. This involved a two-stage method of data extraction. The initial data extraction was done centrally, and incorporated into a series of primary reviews arranged by methods of induction of labour, following a standardised methodology. The data will be extracted from the primary reviews into a series of secondary reviews, arranged by category of woman. To avoid duplication of data in the primary reviews, the labour induction methods have been listed in a specific order, from one to 25. Each primary review includes comparisons between one of the methods (from two to 25) with only those methods above it on the list. Sixty-two trials have been included. Compared to placebo, misoprostol was associated with increased cervical ripening (relative risk of unfavourable or unchanged cervix after 12 to 24 hours with misoprostol 0.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03 to 0.24). It was also associated with reduced failure to achieve vaginal delivery within 24 hours (relative risk (RR) 0.36, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.68). Uterine hyperstimulation, without fetal heart rate changes, was increased (RR 11.7 95% CI 2.78 to 49). Compared with vaginal prostaglandin E2, intracervical prostaglandin E2 and oxytocin, vaginal misoprostol labour induction was associated with less epidural analgesia use, fewer failures to achieve vaginal delivery within 24 hours and more uterine hyperstimulation. Compared with vaginal or intracervical prostaglandin E2, oxytocin augmentation was less common, with misoprostol and meconium-stained liquor more common. Compared with intracervical prostaglandin E2, unchanged or unfavourable cervix after 12 to 24 hours was less common with misoprostol. Lower doses of misoprostol compared to higher doses were associated with more need for oxytocin augmentation, less uterine hyperstimulation, with and without fetal heart rate changes, and a non-significant trend to fewer admissions to neonatal intensive care unit. Use of a gel preparation of misoprostol versus tablet was associated with less hyperstimulation and more use of oxytocin and epidural analgesia. Information on women's views is conspicuously lacking. Vaginal misoprostol appears to be more effective than conventional methods of cervical ripening and labour induction. The apparent increase in uterine hyperstimulation is of concern. Doses not exceeding 25 mcg four-hourly of concern. Doses not exceeding 25 mcg four-hourly appeared to have similar effectiveness and risk of uterine hyperstimulation to conventional labour inducing methods. The studies reviewed were not large enough to exclude the possibility of rare but serious adverse events, particularly uterine rupture, which has been reported anecdotally following misoprostol use in women with and without previous caesarean section. The authors request information on cases of uterine rupture known to readers. Further research is needed to establish the ideal route of administration and dosage, and safety. Professional and governmental bodies should agree guidelines for the use of misoprostol, based on the best available evidence and local circumstances.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                BJO
                BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
                Wiley
                14700328
                14710528
                September 2008
                September 2008
                : 115
                : 10
                : 1279-1288
                Article
                10.1111/j.1471-0528.2008.01829.x
                18715414
                aedd2f3c-b5e3-4a9a-a603-573ae7076d14
                © 2008

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article