Blog
About

1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Using citizen science data to define and track restoration targets in urban areas

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          1. Habitat fragmentation and land degradation, directly and indirectly caused by urbanization, are drastically altering the world's ecosystems and are therefore driving an imperative for ecological restoration within the world's cities. Current methods for the implementation and monitoring of restoration are limited. Restoration ecology needs cost-effective and repeatable tools for tracking changes at global scales, but with local relevance. 2. We propose the Urban Greenspace Integrity Index—a locally relevant measure of an urban greenspace's response to urbanization, derived from widely accessible citizen science data. Unlike classical measurements of biodiversity (e.g. species richness, species diversity), this index measures species-specific responses to continuous measures of urbanization. 3. Increases in this index are evidence of a successful urban restoration project; that is, restoration results in a community shift that favours urban-sensitive species. Importantly, data for this index are easily and efficiently collected by citizen scientists, providing long-term repeatable data. This urban index, calculated from greenspace surveys, correlates with and complements traditional biodiversity metrics. 4. Synthesis and applications. Policymakers and practitioners can use the index—a measure of the urbanness of the local bird community—to define and track restoration of urban ecosystems, effectively measuring changes in biodiversity in response to urbanization: measuring whether the urbanness of the bird community changes through time. Importantly, this index can be calculated using citizen science data, providing a potentially long-term monitoring effort of restoration projects.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 24

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Navigating the multiple meanings of β diversity: a roadmap for the practicing ecologist.

          A recent increase in studies of β diversity has yielded a confusing array of concepts, measures and methods. Here, we provide a roadmap of the most widely used and ecologically relevant approaches for analysis through a series of mission statements. We distinguish two types of β diversity: directional turnover along a gradient vs. non-directional variation. Different measures emphasize different properties of ecological data. Such properties include the degree of emphasis on presence/absence vs. relative abundance information and the inclusion vs. exclusion of joint absences. Judicious use of multiple measures in concert can uncover the underlying nature of patterns in β diversity for a given dataset. A case study of Indonesian coral assemblages shows the utility of a multi-faceted approach. We advocate careful consideration of relevant questions, matched by appropriate analyses. The rigorous application of null models will also help to reveal potential processes driving observed patterns in β diversity. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The current state of citizen science as a tool for ecological research and public engagement

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Distorted Views of Biodiversity: Spatial and Temporal Bias in Species Occurrence Data

              Boakes et al. compile and analyze a historical dataset of 170,000 bird sightings over two centuries and show how changing trends in data gathering may confound a true picture of biodiversity change.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Applied Ecology
                J Appl Ecol
                Wiley
                0021-8901
                1365-2664
                June 09 2019
                June 09 2019
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Centre for Ecosystem Science, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences UNSW Sydney Sydney NSW Australia
                [2 ]Australian Museum Research Institute, Australian Museum Sydney NSW Australia
                [3 ]Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust Sydney NSW Australia
                [4 ]Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences UNSW Sydney Sydney NSW Australia
                Article
                10.1111/1365-2664.13421
                © 2019

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                Comments

                Comment on this article

                Cited by 1