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      P75 interacts with the Nogo receptor as a co-receptor for Nogo, MAG and OMgp.

      Nature

      Signal Transduction, drug effects, Cell Line, Cells, Cultured, Chick Embryo, Cricetinae, GPI-Linked Proteins, Ganglia, Spinal, cytology, Humans, pharmacology, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Myelin Proteins, chemistry, genetics, metabolism, Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein, Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein, Nerve Growth Factor, Neurites, Neurons, Precipitin Tests, Protein Binding, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Rats, Receptor, Nerve Growth Factor, Receptors, Cell Surface, Receptors, Nerve Growth Factor, Animals, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

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          Abstract

          In inhibiting neurite outgrowth, several myelin components, including the extracellular domain of Nogo-A (Nogo-66), oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein (OMgp) and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), exert their effects through the same Nogo receptor (NgR). The glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored nature of NgR indicates the requirement for additional transmembrane protein(s) to transduce the inhibitory signals into the interior of responding neurons. Here, we demonstrate that p75, a transmembrane protein known to be a receptor for the neurotrophin family of growth factors, specifically interacts with NgR. p75 is required for NgR-mediated signalling, as neurons from p75 knockout mice are no longer responsive to myelin and to each of the known NgR ligands. Blocking the p75-NgR interaction also reduces the activities of these inhibitors. Moreover, a truncated p75 protein lacking the intracellular domain, when overexpressed in primary neurons, attenuates the same set of inhibitory activities, suggesting that p75 is a signal transducer of the NgR-p75 receptor complex. Thus, interfering with p75 and its downstream signalling pathways may allow lesioned axons to overcome most of the inhibitory activities associated with central nervous system myelin.

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          Journal
          10.1038/nature01176
          12422217

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