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      Getting to the core of the problem: petrological results from the Irish Stone Axe Project

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      Antiquity
      Cambridge University Press (CUP)

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          Abstract

          When a distribution map of Neolithic stone axes in Ireland was published in ANTIQUITY (Grogan & Cooney 1990), the new Irish Stone Axe Project (ISAP) was mentioned. Stone axes, it turns out, are unusually common in Ireland. Here Project progress is outlined, with special attention being given to those axes identified as having been moved across the Irish Sea.

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          Recent Excavations at Newferry, Co. Antrim.

          The Newferry area is situated to the north of Lough Beg which is almost a northern extension of Lough Neagh, in Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland. Newferry is not a precise geographical area; it lies on both the Antrim and Derry side of the River Bann, and is an extensive area of diatomite flats nearly one mile wide which is bounded to the east and west by the drumlins lining either side of the valley. In early post-glacial times this would have been an extension to Lough Beg and until the Bann was dredged in the 1930's it was still liable to flood during the winter months. On the northern edge on the western side of the river the diatomite is known to run under the edge of Ballymacombs More raised bog. Therefore this lacustrine basin may have extended for another two miles north to Culbane where the high ground of Ballynease would have partially separated it from the next lake basin (fig. 1).
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            Greenstone and diabase utilization in the stone age of western Norway: Technological and socio‐cultural aspects of axe and adze production and distribution

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              The Circulation of Neolithic Stone and Flint Axes: A Case Study from Wales and the Mid-West of England.

              This paper examines the distribution of stone and flint axes in Wales and the mid-west of England based on systematically collected data. Typological variations within the category of implements generally known as axes are discussed, and the distribution of the largest group, true axes, analysed. Three types of distribution are identified: regional distribution, local distribution and waterborne distribution. Proximity of source is shown to play a major role in the frequency and range of axes present in any given area.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                applab
                Antiquity
                Antiquity
                Cambridge University Press (CUP)
                0003-598X
                1745-1744
                December 1995
                January 2015
                : 69
                : 266
                : 969-980
                Article
                10.1017/S0003598X00082508
                af6aec1d-a5f4-4c1f-b573-151aeee151cf
                © 1995
                History

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