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      Nuclear chemistry. Synthesis and detection of a seaborgium carbonyl complex.

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          Abstract

          Experimental investigations of transactinoide elements provide benchmark results for chemical theory and probe the predictive power of trends in the periodic table. So far, in gas-phase chemical reactions, simple inorganic compounds with the transactinoide in its highest oxidation state have been synthesized. Single-atom production rates, short half-lives, and harsh experimental conditions limited the number of experimentally accessible compounds. We applied a gas-phase carbonylation technique previously tested on short-lived molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) isotopes to the preparation of a carbonyl complex of seaborgium, the 106th element. The volatile seaborgium complex showed the same volatility and reactivity with a silicon dioxide surface as those of the hexacarbonyl complexes of the lighter homologs Mo and W. Comparison of the product's adsorption enthalpy with theoretical predictions and data for the lighter congeners supported a Sg(CO)6 formulation.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Science
          Science (New York, N.Y.)
          1095-9203
          0036-8075
          Sep 19 2014
          : 345
          : 6203
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany.
          [2 ] GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany.
          [3 ] Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany. GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany. Institut für Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany. duellman@uni-mainz.de.
          [4 ] RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan.
          [5 ] Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195, Japan.
          [6 ] Institut für Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany.
          [7 ] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland. Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen, Switzerland.
          [8 ] Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 730000 Lanzhou, China.
          [9 ] Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195, Japan. Department of Chemistry, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526, Japan.
          [10 ] RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan. Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Higashi-Ku, Fukuoka, 812-8581, Japan.
          [11 ] RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan. Department of Chemistry, Niigata University, Niigata, Niigata 950-2181, Japan.
          [12 ] Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460, USA. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8169, USA.
          [13 ] Department of Chemistry, Niigata University, Niigata, Niigata 950-2181, Japan.
          [14 ] Helmholtz-Institut Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany. Institut für Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, 55099 Mainz, Germany.
          [15 ] RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan. Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570, Japan.
          Article
          345/6203/1491
          10.1126/science.1255720
          25237098
          Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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