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      Use of ozone in food industries for reducing the environmental impact of cleaning and disinfection activities

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      Trends in Food Science & Technology
      Elsevier BV

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          Microbiological Aspects of Ozone Applications in Food: A Review

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            A comparison of ozonation and chlorination for the disinfection of stainless steel surfaces.

            Ozonated water and chlorinated sanitizer were compared for effectiveness against biofilms of milk spoilage bacteria. Stainless steel plates were incubated in UHT-pasteurized milk inoculated with pure cultures of either Pseudomonas fluorescens (ATCC 949) or Alcaligenes faecalis (ATCC 337). After incubation, the plates were removed and rinsed in sterile PBS. A control rinsed stainless steel plate was swabbed and plated on standard plate count agar. A second rinsed stainless steel plate was covered and treated for 2 min with a commercial chlorinated sanitizer (dichloro-s-triazinetrione), prepared according to the manufacturer's recommendations; after treatment, the plate was rinsed twice in sterile PBS, swabbed, and plated on standard plate count agar. A third rinsed stainless steel plate from the culture was placed in ozonated deionized H2O (.5 ppm of ozone) for 10 min, rinsed twice as described, swabbed, and plated. Both ozonation and chlorination reduced bacteria populations by > 99% at initial cell densities in the range of approximately 1.24 x 10(5) to 8.56 x 10(5) cfu/cm2 for P. fluorescens and 1.53 x 10(4) to 8.56 x 10(5) cfu/cm2 for A. faecalis in milk films on stainless steel surfaces.
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              Ozone and its current and future application in the food industry.

              The food industry is interested considerably in using ozone to enhance the shelf-life and safety of food products and in exploring new applications of the sanitizer. This interest was recently accompanied by a US governmental approval of ozone for the safe use, in gaseous and aqueous phases, as an antimicrobial agent on food, including meat and poultry. Ozone has a strong microbicidal action against bacteria, fungi, parasites and viruses when these microorganisms are present in low ozone-demand media. Readily available organic constituents in food, however, compete with microorganisms for applied ozone and thus efficacy of the treatment is minimized. Ozone is suitable for washing and sanitizing solid food with intact and smooth surfaces (e.g., fruits and vegetables) and ozone-sanitized fresh produce has recently been introduced in the US market. Use of ozone to sanitize equipment, packaging materials, and processing environment is currently investigated. Efforts to decontaminate bean sprouts and remove biofilm with ozone have not been successful. The antimicrobial efficacy can be enhanced considerably when ozonation is combined with other chemical (e.g., hydrogen peroxide) or physical (e.g., ultraviolet radiation) treatments. Mechanical action is also needed as a means to dislodge microorganisms from the surface of food and expose them to the action of the sanitizer. The food industry also is interested in using ozone to decontaminate processing water and decrease its chemical and biological oxygen demand. This application improves the reusability of processing water and allows for environment-friendly processing operations.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Trends in Food Science & Technology
                Trends in Food Science & Technology
                Elsevier BV
                09242244
                January 2007
                January 2007
                : 18
                :
                : S29-S35
                Article
                10.1016/j.tifs.2006.10.006
                afc35f6a-ecc4-4007-8bb5-87e23efc34c7
                © 2007

                http://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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