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      Anurofauna of a remnant of Atlantic Forest in northeast Brazil

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      Neotropical Biology and Conservation

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          Studies on spatial occupation are fundamental to understand amphibian communities. The aim of this study was to record information on the spatial distribution of anurans in the Tejipió forest, state of Pernambuco, Northeastern Brazil. Fieldwork was carried out weekly between October 2011 and April 2012, with daytime and night-time excursions for time-constrained active searching, in forested and open areas, military construction area and water bodies. Pitfall traps and accidental sightings were also used as alternative collection methods. Data were used to calculate richness, rarefaction curves and richness estimators. A total of 21 species were recorded, distributed in six families: Bufonidae (2 spp.); Craugastoridae (1 sp.); Hylidae (8 spp.); Leptodactylidae (8 spp.); Microhylidae (1 sp.) and Phyllomedusidae (1 sp.). Only the species Rhinella jimi was found occupying all sampled habitats in the research area. Adenomera hylaedactyla and Pristimantis ramagii deserve special care in the area because they are specialists, occupying a smaller number of habitats and microhabitats. The community of anurans of the Tejipió forest is similar to those recorded in other areas of the Atlantic Forest at the Pernambuco State, and its knowledge is essential as a basis for conservation of the area. The gradual recovery of this Atlantic Forest remnant would favor the recolonization of fauna and flora and the conservation of local biodiversity.

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          Most cited references 19

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          Global Biodiversity Conservation: The Critical Role of Hotspots

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            Population Declines and Priorities for Amphibian Conservation in Latin America

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              New World direct-developing frogs (Anura: Terrarana): Molecular phylogeny, classification, biogeography, and conservation

              New World frogs recently placed in a single, enormous family (Brachycephalidae) have direct development and reproduce on land, often far away from water. DNA sequences from mitochondrial and nuclear genes of 344 species were analyzed to estimate their relationships. The molecular phylogeny in turn was used as the basis for a revised classification of the group. The 882 described species are placed in a new taxon, Terrarana, and allocated to four families, four subfamilies, 24 genera, 11 subgenera, 33 species series, 56 species groups, and 11 species subgroups. Systematic accounts are provided for all taxa above the species level. Two families (Craugastoridae and Strabomantidae), three subfamilies (Holoadeninae, Phyzelaphryninae, and Strabomantinae), six genera (Bryophryne, Diasporus, Haddadus, Isodactylus, Lynchius, and Psychrophrynella), and two subgenera (Campbellius and Schwartzius) are proposed and named as new taxa, 13 subspecies are considered to be distinct species, and 613 new combinations are formed. Most of the 100 informal groups (species series, species groups, and species subgroups) are new or newly defined. Brachycephalus and Ischnocnema are placed in Brachycephalidae, a relatively small clade restricted primarily to southeastern Brazil. Eleutherodactylidae includes two subfamilies, four genera, and five subgenera and is centered in the Caribbean region. Craugastoridae contains two genera and three subgenera and is distributed mainly in Middle America. Strabomantidae is distributed primarily in the Andes of northwestern South America and includes two subfamilies, 16 genera, and three subgenera. Images and distribution maps are presented for taxa above the species level and a complete list of species is provided. Aspects of the evolution, biogeography, and conservation of Terrarana are discussed.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Neotropical Biology and Conservation
                NBC
                Pensoft Publishers
                2236-3777
                October 01 2020
                October 01 2020
                : 15
                : 4
                : 415-425
                Article
                10.3897/neotropical.15.e49656
                © 2020

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