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      Understanding students’ and clinicians’ experiences of informal interprofessional workplace learning: an Australian qualitative study

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          Abstract

          Objectives

          While postgraduate studies have begun to shed light on informal interprofessional workplace learning, studies with preregistration learners have typically focused on formal and structured work-based learning. The current study investigated preregistration students’ informal interprofessional workplace learning by exploring students’ and clinicians’ experiences of interprofessional student-clinician (IPSC) interactions.

          Design

          A qualitative interview study using narrative techniques was conducted.

          Setting

          Student placements across multiple clinical sites in Victoria, Australia.

          Participants

          Through maximum variation sampling, 61 participants (38 students and 23 clinicians) were recruited from six professions (medicine, midwifery, nursing, occupational therapy, paramedicine and physiotherapy).

          Methods

          We conducted 12 group and 10 individual semistructured interviews. Themes were identified through framework analysis, and the similarities and differences in subthemes by participant group were interrogated.

          Results

          Six themes relating to four research questions were identified: (1) conceptualisations of IPSC interactions; (2) context for interaction experiences; (3) the nature of interaction experiences; (4) factors contributing to positive or negative interactions; (5) positive or negative consequences of interactions and (6) suggested improvements for IPSC interactions. Seven noteworthy differences in subthemes between students and clinicians and across the professions were identified.

          Conclusions

          Despite the results largely supporting previous postgraduate research, the findings illustrate greater breadth and depth of understandings, experiences and suggestions for preregistration education. Educators and students are encouraged to seek opportunities for informal interprofessional learning afforded by the workplace.

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          Most cited references26

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          Using reflexivity to optimize teamwork in qualitative research.

          Reflexivity is often described as an individual activity. The authors propose that reflexivity employed as a team activity, through the sharing of reflexive writing (accounts of personal agendas, hidden assumptions, and theoretical definitions) and group discussions about arising issues, can improve the productivity and functioning of qualitative teams and the rigor and quality of the research. The authors review the literature on teamwork, highlighting benefits and pitfalls, and define and discuss the role for reflexivity. They describe their own team and detail how they work together on a project investigating doctor-patient communication about prescribing. The authors present two reflexive tools they have used and show through examples how they have influenced the effectiveness of their team in terms of process, quality, and outcome.
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            Informal learning in the workplace

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              Prior experience of interprofessional learning enhances undergraduate nursing and healthcare students' professional identity and attitudes to teamwork.

              How willing are today's medical, nursing and other healthcare students to undertake some of their studies as shared learning? There is a lack of evidence of students' views by discipline despite this being a priority task for higher education sectors. This study explored the views of nursing, midwifery, nursing-emergency health (paramedic), medical, physiotherapy and nutrition-dietetics students.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                BMJ Open
                BMJ Open
                bmjopen
                bmjopen
                BMJ Open
                BMJ Publishing Group (BMA House, Tavistock Square, London, WC1H 9JR )
                2044-6055
                2018
                17 April 2018
                : 8
                : 4
                : e021238
                Affiliations
                [1 ] departmentMonash Centre for Scholarship in Health Education (MCSHE), Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences , Monash University , Clayton, Victoria, Australia
                [2 ] departmentResearch Department of Medical Education , University College London , London, UK
                [3 ] departmentFaculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences , Monash University , Clayton, Victoria, Australia
                [4 ] departmentDepartment of Occupational Therapy, School of Primary and Allied Health Care, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences , Monash University , Frankston, Victoria, Australia
                [5 ] departmentSchool of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences , Monash University , Clayton, Victoria, Australia
                [6 ] departmentSchool of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences , McMaster University , Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
                [7 ] departmentDepartment of Physiotherapy, School of Primary and Allied Health Care, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences , Monash University , Frankston, Victoria, Australia
                [8 ] departmentDepartment of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences , Monash University , Frankston, Victoria, Australia
                [9 ] departmentDivision of Paramedicine , University of Tasmania , Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
                Author notes
                [Correspondence to ] Dr Charlotte E Rees; charlotte.rees@ 123456monash.edu
                Author information
                http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8744-930X
                Article
                bmjopen-2017-021238
                10.1136/bmjopen-2017-021238
                5905730
                29666140
                affefc3f-4b04-4dec-81bd-2fd2a834d281
                © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

                This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

                History
                : 18 December 2017
                : 09 March 2018
                : 19 March 2018
                Funding
                Funded by: Monash University Faculty of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences;
                Categories
                Medical Education and Training
                Research
                1506
                1709
                Custom metadata
                unlocked

                Medicine
                qualitative research
                Medicine
                qualitative research

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