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      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Autistic spectrum disorder and offending behaviour – a brief review of the literature

      Advances in Autism

      Emerald Publishing Limited

      ASD, Autism, Developmental, Disabilities, Offending

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Purpose

          The purpose of this paper to synthesise much of the existing research on autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and offending behaviour.

          Design/methodology/approach

          It considers three key areas, namely, first, a discussion about the nature of ASD and how it might be related to offending behaviour; second, a brief commentary about the prevalence of this population; and, finally, an exploration of the effective management and possible treatment outcomes.

          Findings

          Methodological limitations have resulted in variable findings which has hindered our understanding of this population. Some of the research is based on small, highly specialist samples making prevalence difficult to measure. The link between ASD and offending is still not well understood, and despite advances in staff training, awareness amongst practitioners remains an underdeveloped area, thus yielding variable treatment outcomes.

          Originality/value

          This review continues to demonstrate the urgent need for robust research in order to better understand the link between ASD and offending behaviour, to provide tailored, needs-led interventions, and reduce the risk of offending amongst this group as a whole.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 78

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          Prevalence of Asperger's syndrome in a secure hospital.

          The hypothesis that Asperger's syndrome (AS) may go unrecognised in forensic populations was examined by ascertaining the prevalence in Broadmoor Special Hospital. The entire male patient population was screened by examination of case notes. Identified cases were subject to the next stage of the study, which involved observation and interviewing of patients, and a semi-structured interview of key staff. A prevalence of 1.5% (0.6% to 3.3%, 95% CI) was found. The addition of equivocal cases increased the prevalence to 2.3%. The prevalence of AS in Broadmoor Hospital is greater than that reported for the general population.
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            Asperger's Syndrome in Forensic Settings

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              • Abstract: found
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              Offending behaviour in adults with Asperger syndrome.

              Considerable speculation is evident both within the scientific literature and popular media regarding possible links between Asperger syndrome and offending. A survey methodology that utilised quantitative data collection was employed to investigate the prevalence of offending behaviour amongst adults with Asperger Syndrome in a large geographical area of South Wales, UK; qualitative interviews were then conducted with a sub-sample of those identified. A small number of participants meeting the study criteria were identified. For those who had offended, their experience of the criminal justice system was essentially negative. Possible implications of the results were discussed.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                AIA
                10.1108/AIA
                Advances in Autism
                AIA
                Emerald Publishing Limited
                2056-3868
                02 July 2018
                : 4
                : 3
                : 109-121
                Affiliations
                School of Health & Social Care, London South Bank University , London, UK
                Author notes
                Salma Ali can be contacted at: alis134@lsbu.ac.uk
                Article
                615932 AIA-05-2018-0015.pdf AIA-05-2018-0015
                10.1108/AIA-05-2018-0015
                © Emerald Publishing Limited
                Page count
                Figures: 0, Tables: 0, Equations: 0, References: 112, Pages: 13, Words: 7556
                Product
                Categories
                e-literature-review, Literature review
                cat-HSC, Health & social care
                cat-LID, Learning & intellectual disabilities
                Custom metadata
                yes
                yes
                JOURNAL
                included

                Health & Social care

                Offending, Disabilities, Developmental, Autism, ASD

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