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      Conservation of phylogeographic lineages under climate change : African mammals and global warming

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      Global Ecology and Biogeography
      Wiley-Blackwell

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          Consequences of climate change on the tree of life in Europe.

          Many species are projected to become vulnerable to twenty-first-century climate changes, with consequent effects on the tree of life. If losses were not randomly distributed across the tree of life, climate change could lead to a disproportionate loss of evolutionary history. Here we estimate the consequences of climate change on the phylogenetic diversities of plant, bird and mammal assemblages across Europe. Using a consensus across ensembles of forecasts for 2020, 2050 and 2080 and high-resolution phylogenetic trees, we show that species vulnerability to climate change clusters weakly across phylogenies. Such phylogenetic signal in species vulnerabilities does not lead to higher loss of evolutionary history than expected with a model of random extinctions. This is because vulnerable species have neither fewer nor closer relatives than the remaining clades. Reductions in phylogenetic diversity will be greater in southern Europe, and gains are expected in regions of high latitude or altitude. However, losses will not be offset by gains and the tree of life faces a trend towards homogenization across the continent.
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            The role of taxonomy in species conservation.

            Taxonomy and species conservation are often assumed to be completely interdependent activities. However, a shortage of taxonomic information and skills, and confusion over where the limits to 'species' should be set, both cause problems for conservationists. There is no simple solution because species lists used for conservation planning (e.g. threatened species, species richness estimates, species covered by legislation) are often also used to determine which units should be the focus of conservation actions; this despite the fact that the two processes have such different goals and information needs. Species conservation needs two kinds of taxonomic solution: (i) a set of practical rules to standardize the species units included on lists; and (ii) an approach to the units chosen for conservation recovery planning which recognizes the dynamic nature of natural systems and the differences from the units in listing processes that result. These solutions are well within our grasp but require a new kind of collaboration among conservation biologists, taxonomists and legislators, as well as an increased resource of taxonomists with relevant and high-quality skills.
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              Integrating biophysical models and evolutionary theory to predict climatic impacts on species’ ranges: the dengue mosquitoAedes aegyptiin Australia

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Global Ecology and Biogeography
                Wiley-Blackwell
                1466822X
                January 2013
                January 2013
                : 22
                : 1
                : 93-104
                Article
                10.1111/j.1466-8238.2012.00774.x
                b0393f00-4e5b-4b2f-a160-bb407ccdadfc
                © 2013

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1


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