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      Effects of simulated long-term climatic change on the bryophytes of a limestone grassland community

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      Global Change Biology

      Wiley-Blackwell

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          The response of two contrasting limestone grasslands to simulated climate change.

           A. Askew,  D Corker,  I Clarke (2000)
          Two different UK limestone grasslands were exposed to simulated climate change with the use of nonintrusive techniques to manipulate local climate over 5 years. Resistance to climate change, defined as the ability of a community to maintain its composition and biomass in response to environmental stress, could be explained by reference to the functional composition and successional status of the grasslands. The more fertile, early-successional grassland was much more responsive to climate change. Resistance could not be explained by the particular climates experienced by the two grasslands. Productive, disturbed landscapes created by modern human activity may prove more vulnerable to climate change than older, traditional landscapes.
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            Summer warming and increased winter snow cover affect Sphagnum fuscum growth, structure and production in a sub-arctic bog

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              Rapid recovery of photosystems on rewetting desiccation-tolerant mosses: chlorophyll fluorescence and inhibitor experiments.

              In the mosses Racomitrium lanuginosum, Anomodon viticulosus and Rhytidiadelphus loreus, after a few days air dry, F:(v)/F:(m) reached, within the first minute of remoistening in the dark, two-thirds or more of the value attained after 40 min. A fast initial phase of recovery was completed within 10-20 min after which further change was slow. Initial recovery of Phi(PSII) in the light was somewhat slower, but was generally substantially complete within a similar time. Remoistening with 0.3 mM cycloheximide (CHX) or 3 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) made little difference to this short-term (40 min) recovery of either F:(v)/F:(m) or Phi(PSII); 3 mM chloramphenicol (CMP) had little effect on recovery of F:(v)/F:(m), but resulted in substantial (though not total) depression of Phi(PSII) and (14)CO(2) uptake. Effects of the protein-synthesis inhibitors and DTT were much more clearly apparent in longer-term experiments (>20 h) but only in the light. In the dark, the three inhibitors had at most only slight effects over periods of 60-100 h. In the light, CMP-treated samples of all three species showed a progressive decline of dark-adapted F:(v)/F:(m), falling to zero within 1-5 d (possibly due to blocking of the turnover of the D1 protein of PSII) and accelerated by DTT. CHX-treated samples showed a similar but slower decline. In the shade-adapted and relatively desiccation-sensitive Rhytidiadelphus loreus, slow recovery of F:(v)/F:(m) continued in the dark even in the presence of CMP and CHX for much of the 142 h of the experiment. The results indicate that in desiccation-tolerant bryophytes recovery of photosynthesis after periods of a few days air dry requires only limited chloroplast protein synthesis and is substantially independent of protein synthesis in the cytoplasm.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Global Change Biology
                Global Change Biol
                Wiley-Blackwell
                1354-1013
                1365-2486
                May 2005
                May 2005
                : 11
                : 5
                : 757-769
                Article
                10.1111/j.1365-2486.2005.00953.x
                © 2005

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