8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      New Developments in Material Preparation Using a Combination of Ionic Liquids and Microwave Irradiation

      , , , *

      Nanomaterials

      MDPI

      ionic liquids, microwave, synthetic methods, nanomaterials, polymers

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          During recent years, synthetic methods combining microwaves and ionic liquids became accepted as a promising methodology for various materials preparations because of their high efficiency and low energy consumption. Ionic liquids with high polarity are heated rapidly, volumetrically and simultaneously under microwave irradiation. Hence, combination of microwave irradiation as a heating source with ionic liquids with various roles (e.g., solvent, additive, template or reactant) opened a completely new technique in the last twenty years for nanomaterials and polymers preparation for applications in various materials science fields including polymer science. This review summarizes recent developments of some common materials syntheses using microwave-assisted ionic liquid method with a focus on inorganic nanomaterials, polymers, carbon-derived composites and biomass-based composites. After that, the mechanisms involved in microwave-assisted ionic-liquid (MAIL) are discussed briefly. This review also highlights the role of ionic liquids in the reaction and crucial issues that should be addressed in future research involving this synthesis technique.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 150

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Ordered nanoporous arrays of carbon supporting high dispersions of platinum nanoparticles.

          Nanostructured carbon materials are potentially of great technological interest for the development of electronic, catalytic and hydrogen-storage systems. Here we describe a general strategy for the synthesis of highly ordered, rigid arrays of nanoporous carbon having uniform but tunable diameters (typically 6 nanometres inside and 9 nanometres outside). These structures are formed by using ordered mesoporous silicas as templates, the removal of which leaves a partially ordered graphitic framework. The resulting material supports a high dispersion of platinum nanoparticles, exceeding that of other common microporous carbon materials (such as carbon black, charcoal and activated carbon fibres). The platinum cluster diameter can be controlled to below 3 nanometres, and the high dispersion of these metal clusters gives rise to promising electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction, which could prove to be practically relevant for fuel-cell technologies. These nanomaterials can also be prepared in the form of free-standing films by using ordered silica films as the templates.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) as a building block platform: Biological properties, synthesis and synthetic applications

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Microwave assisted organic synthesis—a review

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nanomaterials (Basel)
                Nanomaterials (Basel)
                nanomaterials
                Nanomaterials
                MDPI
                2079-4991
                22 April 2019
                April 2019
                : 9
                : 4
                Affiliations
                College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300350, China; wangyannan@ 123456nankai.edu.cn (Y.W.); houqidong@ 123456nankai.edu.cn (Q.H.); jumeit@ 123456nankai.edu.cn (M.J.)
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: liweizun@ 123456nankai.edu.cn ; Tel.: +86-135-1221-2566
                Article
                nanomaterials-09-00647
                10.3390/nano9040647
                6523822
                31013641
                © 2019 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                Categories
                Review

                Comments

                Comment on this article