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Jasmonate perception by inositol phosphate-potentiated COI1-JAZ co-receptor

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      Abstract

      Jasmonates (JAs) are a family of plant hormones that regulate plant growth, development, and responses to stress. The F-box protein CORONATINE-INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1) mediates JA signaling by promoting hormone-dependent ubiquitination and degradation of transcriptional repressor JAZ proteins. Despite its importance, the mechanism of JA perception remains unclear. Here we present structural and pharmacological data to show that the true JA receptor is a complex of both COI1 and JAZ. COI1 contains an open pocket that recognizes the bioactive hormone, (3R,7S)-jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile), with high specificity. High-affinity hormone binding requires a bipartite JAZ degron sequence consisting of a conserved α-helix for COI1 docking and a loop region to trap the hormone in its binding pocket. In addition, we identify a third critical component of the JA co-receptor complex, inositol pentakisphosphate, which interacts with both COI1 and JAZ adjacent to the ligand. Our results unravel the mechanism of JA perception and highlight the ability of F-box proteins to evolve as multi-component signaling hubs.

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      Most cited references 39

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
            [2 ]Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Box 357280, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
            [3 ]Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA
            [4 ]Department of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA
            [5 ]Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824, USA
            [6 ]Department of Biological Chemistry, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
            [7 ]Department of Biological Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-B52 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501, Japan 4259
            [8 ]Mass Spectrometry Resource, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism, and Lipid research, Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
            [9 ]Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA
            [10 ]Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 6000 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA
            Author notes
            Correspondence and requests for materials should be addressed to N.Z. ( nzheng@ 123456u.washington.edu )
            [†]

            Present address: Department of Genetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA

            [*]

            These authors contributed equally to this work.

            Journal
            0410462
            6011
            Nature
            Nature
            0028-0836
            1476-4687
            24 August 2010
            6 October 2010
            18 November 2010
            18 May 2011
            : 468
            : 7322
            : 400-405
            2988090
            20927106
            10.1038/nature09430
            nihpa230784

            Users may view, print, copy, download and text and data- mine the content in such documents, for the purposes of academic research, subject always to the full Conditions of use: http://www.nature.com/authors/editorial_policies/license.html#terms

            Funding
            Funded by: National Institute of General Medical Sciences : NIGMS
            Funded by: National Cancer Institute : NCI
            Funded by: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Extramural Activities : NIAID
            Funded by: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases : NIDDK
            Funded by: Howard Hughes Medical Institute
            Award ID: R01 GM057795-12 ||GM
            Funded by: National Institute of General Medical Sciences : NIGMS
            Funded by: National Cancer Institute : NCI
            Funded by: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Extramural Activities : NIAID
            Funded by: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases : NIDDK
            Funded by: Howard Hughes Medical Institute
            Award ID: R01 CA107134-07 ||CA
            Funded by: National Institute of General Medical Sciences : NIGMS
            Funded by: National Cancer Institute : NCI
            Funded by: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Extramural Activities : NIAID
            Funded by: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases : NIDDK
            Funded by: Howard Hughes Medical Institute
            Award ID: R01 AI068718-04 ||AI
            Funded by: National Institute of General Medical Sciences : NIGMS
            Funded by: National Cancer Institute : NCI
            Funded by: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Extramural Activities : NIAID
            Funded by: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases : NIDDK
            Funded by: Howard Hughes Medical Institute
            Award ID: P30 DK056341-10 ||DK
            Funded by: National Institute of General Medical Sciences : NIGMS
            Funded by: National Cancer Institute : NCI
            Funded by: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Extramural Activities : NIAID
            Funded by: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases : NIDDK
            Funded by: Howard Hughes Medical Institute
            Award ID: ||HHMI_
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