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      Psychological Influence towards Health Consumers Intention to use A Malaysia National Web based Health Information Service

      , , ,
      Environment-Behaviour Proceedings Journal
      e-IPH Ltd.

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          Abstract

          Drawing upon Health Belief Model, the study investigated the psychological predictors that determine the usage intention of the Malaysian web-based health information service, MyHEALTH Portal. The results of the measurement model show the evidences of outcome expectations and internal cues as the predictors to the portal usage, while external cues was found to be insignificant. The findings would help the Malaysia Ministry of Health in identifying significant psychological factors that influence the portal usage. This would allow them to re-strategize the portal’s marketing and promotional works effectively thus to be maximally used by the public while achieving its long-term goal.

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          Proposed model of the relationship of risk information seeking and processing to the development of preventive behaviors.

          We articulate a model that focuses on characteristics of individuals that might predispose them to seek and process information about health in different ways. Specifically, the model proposes that seven factors-(1) individual characteristics, (2) perceived hazard characteristics, (3) affective response to the risk, (4) felt social pressures to possess relevant information, (5) information sufficiency, (6) one's personal capacity to learn, (7) beliefs about the usefulness of information in various channels-will influence the extent to which a person will seek out this risk information in both routine and nonroutine channels and the extent to which he or she will spend time and effort analyzing the risk information critically. By adapting and synthesizing aspects of Eagly and Chaiken's Heuristic-Systematic Model and Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior, we also expect that people who engage in more effortful information seeking and processing are more likely to develop risk-related cognitions, attitudes, and behaviors that are more stable (i.e., less changeable or volatile) over time. Since most forms of health information campaigns attempt to get people to adopt habitual or lifestyle changes, factors leading to the stability or volatility of those behavioral changes are essential concerns. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.
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            Investigating healthcare professionals’ decisions to accept telemedicine technology: an empirical test of competing theories

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              Information Sufficiency and Risk Communication

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Environment-Behaviour Proceedings Journal
                E-BPJ
                e-IPH Ltd.
                2398-4287
                March 02 2018
                March 02 2018
                : 3
                : 7
                : 167
                Article
                10.21834/e-bpj.v3i7.1263
                b15e7429-7f96-47d0-8a82-ecdbf3467ff3
                © 2018

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/


                Psychology,Urban design & Planning,Urban studies,General behavioral science,Cultural studies

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