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      Smoking-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors in the lesbian, gay and bisexual community: A population-based study from the U.S. Pacific Northwest

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          Abstract

          Several studies have shown that lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) persons have higher smoking prevalence than heterosexuals. However, few population-based studies have explored whether smoking-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors also differ between the communities. We used Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data for 2003 to 2005 from two states (Washington and Oregon) to compare smoking-related indicators between the self-identified LGB population and their heterosexual counterparts. Lesbians, gays and bisexuals were more likely to be current or ever smokers than their heterosexual counterparts. All except bisexual men and had lower quit ratios than heterosexuals. Among successful quitters, bisexual men were less likely to be long-term quitters than heterosexuals. For all groups, attitudes and behaviors regarding secondhand smoke (SHS) were similar to those of heterosexuals, except for bisexual women, who were more likely to be exposed to SHS. Despite a disparity in smoking prevalence, the LGB population in these two states appeared to have similar levels of knowledge and attitudes toward tobacco control as their heterosexual counterparts. Nevertheless, tobacco control programs should continue to focus on this population to prevent smoking initiation, promote cessation, and reduce secondhand smoke exposure.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Preventive Medicine
          Preventive Medicine
          Elsevier BV
          00917435
          June 2009
          June 2009
          : 48
          : 6
          : 555-561
          Article
          10.1016/j.ypmed.2009.03.013
          19306893
          b1f48ea1-f4ec-4bd1-b399-dc7e38a52abd
          © 2009

          https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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