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      Bio-Inspired Human-Computer-Interaction

      Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction Conference

      4 - 6 July 2018

      Bio-inspired HCI, Naturalistic interface, Virtual human, Neurocomputation, Ethology

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          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Bio-inspiration, the use of principles derived from biological system to the construction of artefacts, has been successfully applied in many areas of engineering. Here I argue that Human-Computer-Interaction can greatly benefit from applying principles found in different areas of biology. While HCI system, in general, can learn from biology, the recent trend of moving away from conventional user interfaces to a more naturalistic interaction makes bio-inspiration timely. To support the case, the paper maps four domains of HCI to areas of biological sciences and gives examples of works that applied the underlying principles.

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          Most cited references 13

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          Intelligence without representation

           Rodney Brooks (1991)
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            The role of phase synchronization in memory processes.

            In recent years, studies ranging from single-unit recordings in animals to electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography studies in humans have demonstrated the pivotal role of phase synchronization in memory processes. Phase synchronization - here referring to the synchronization of oscillatory phases between different brain regions - supports both working memory and long-term memory and acts by facilitating neural communication and by promoting neural plasticity. There is evidence that processes underlying working and long-term memory might interact in the medial temporal lobe. We propose that this is accomplished by neural operations involving phase-phase and phase-amplitude synchronization. A deeper understanding of how phase synchronization supports the flexibility of and interaction between memory systems may yield new insights into the functions of phase synchronization in general.
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              Psychosocial and Psychophysiological Effects of Human-Animal Interactions: The Possible Role of Oxytocin

              During the last decade it has become more widely accepted that pet ownership and animal assistance in therapy and education may have a multitude of positive effects on humans. Here, we review the evidence from 69 original studies on human-animal interactions (HAI) which met our inclusion criteria with regard to sample size, peer-review, and standard scientific research design. Among the well-documented effects of HAI in humans of different ages, with and without special medical, or mental health conditions are benefits for: social attention, social behavior, interpersonal interactions, and mood; stress-related parameters such as cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure; self-reported fear and anxiety; and mental and physical health, especially cardiovascular diseases. Limited evidence exists for positive effects of HAI on: reduction of stress-related parameters such as epinephrine and norepinephrine; improvement of immune system functioning and pain management; increased trustworthiness of and trust toward other persons; reduced aggression; enhanced empathy and improved learning. We propose that the activation of the oxytocin system plays a key role in the majority of these reported psychological and psychophysiological effects of HAI. Oxytocin and HAI effects largely overlap, as documented by research in both, humans and animals, and first studies found that HAI affects the oxytocin system. As a common underlying mechanism, the activation of the oxytocin system does not only provide an explanation, but also allows an integrative view of the different effects of HAI.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2018
                July 2018
                : 1-4
                Affiliations
                Aston University

                Aston Triangle, B4 7ET, Birmingham, UK
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2018.86
                © Bernardet. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2018. Belfast, UK.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                HCI
                32
                Belfast, UK
                4 - 6 July 2018
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction Conference
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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