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      Facile synthesis of biocompatible N, S-doped carbon dots for cell imaging and ion detecting

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          Abstract

          A facile, simple, effective and green method has been developed to synthesize nitrogen and sulfur co-doped carbon dots (N, S-CDs) from heparin sodium.

          Abstract

          A facile, simple, effective and green method has been developed to synthesize nitrogen and sulfur co-doped carbon dots (N, S-CDs) from heparin sodium. The as-prepared N, S-CDs possess naked-eye observable blue-green luminescence, good biocompatibility, low toxicity and strong fluorescence in live cell imaging, indicating their great potential to serve as high quality optical imaging probes. Besides, the N, S-CDs can also be used as a competitive fluorescent sensing platform for the detection of Fe 3+.

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          Most cited references56

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          Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays with high electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction.

          The large-scale practical application of fuel cells will be difficult to realize if the expensive platinum-based electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) cannot be replaced by other efficient, low-cost, and stable electrodes. Here, we report that vertically aligned nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes (VA-NCNTs) can act as a metal-free electrode with a much better electrocatalytic activity, long-term operation stability, and tolerance to crossover effect than platinum for oxygen reduction in alkaline fuel cells. In air-saturated 0.1 molar potassium hydroxide, we observed a steady-state output potential of -80 millivolts and a current density of 4.1 milliamps per square centimeter at -0.22 volts, compared with -85 millivolts and 1.1 milliamps per square centimeter at -0.20 volts for a platinum-carbon electrode. The incorporation of electron-accepting nitrogen atoms in the conjugated nanotube carbon plane appears to impart a relatively high positive charge density on adjacent carbon atoms. This effect, coupled with aligning the NCNTs, provides a four-electron pathway for the ORR on VA-NCNTs with a superb performance.
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            Quantum-sized carbon dots for bright and colorful photoluminescence.

            We report that nanoscale carbon particles (carbon dots) upon simple surface passivation are strongly photoluminescent in both solution and the solid state. The luminescence emission of the carbon dots is stable against photobleaching, and there is no blinking effect. These strongly emissive carbon dots may find applications similar to or beyond those of their widely pursued silicon counterparts.
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              Highly photoluminescent carbon dots for multicolor patterning, sensors, and bioimaging.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                RSCACL
                RSC Advances
                RSC Adv.
                Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
                2046-2069
                2015
                2015
                : 5
                : 21
                : 16368-16375
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Polymer Science and Engineering
                [2 ]State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry
                [3 ]Key Laboratory of High Performance Polymer Materials and Technology of Ministry of Education
                [4 ]School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
                [5 ]Nanjing University
                Article
                10.1039/C4RA13820A
                b236c86f-bafb-400f-b34c-34fadc9a3f65
                © 2015
                History

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