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      A psychrotolerant strain of Serratia marcescens (MTCC 4822) produces laccase at wide temperature and pH range

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          Abstract

          A psychrotolerant bacterial strain of Serratia marcescens, originally isolated from a glacial site in Indian Himalayan Region (IHR), has been investigated for laccase production under different culture conditions. The bacterial strain was found to grow between 4 to 45°C (opt. 25°C) and 3 to 14 pH (opt. 5 pH) on prescribed growth medium, coinciding with production of laccase in laccase producing medium. However, the production of laccase was more consistent toward alkaline pH. Laccase enzyme was partially purified using gel filtration chromatography. The molecular mass of laccase was determined ~53 kDa on native PAGE. The Km and Vmax values were determined to be 0.10 mM and 50.00 μM min −1, respectively, with ABTS. Inoculum size (4.0% v/v at 1.5 O.D.) resulted in significantly higher production of laccase. Carbon and nitrogen sources also affected the laccase production significantly. All the carbon sources enhanced laccase production, xylose being the best enhancer (P < 0.01). Among nitrogen sources, organic sources were found to act as inhibitors (P < 0.01), and among the in-organic sources only sodium nitrate enhanced the laccase production. Low molecular weight organic solvents significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced laccase production up to 24 h of incubation with a decline in later incubation period. Production of laccase by the psychrotolerant bacterium in wide range of temperature and pH is likely to have inference in biotechnological processes.

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          Most cited references 35

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            Stationary-phase physiology.

            Bacteria enjoy an infinite capacity for reproduction as long as they reside in an environment supporting growth. However, their rapid growth and efficient metabolism ultimately results in depletion of growth-supporting substrates and the population of cells enters a phase defined as the stationary phase of growth. In this phase, their reproductive ability is gradually lost. The molecular mechanism underlying this cellular degeneration has not been fully deciphered. Still, recent analysis of the physiology and molecular biology of stationary-phase E. coli cells has revealed interesting similarities to the aging process of higher organisms. The similarities include increased oxidation of cellular constituents and its target specificity, the role of antioxidants and oxygen tension in determining life span, and an apparent trade-off between activities related to reproduction and survival.
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              Bacterial laccases

               P Sharma,  R Goel,  N Capalash (2007)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                gaurav.gsk90@gmail.com
                kusumshakar@gmail.com
                anita@gbpihed.nic.in
                Journal
                AMB Express
                AMB Express
                AMB Express
                Springer Berlin Heidelberg (Berlin/Heidelberg )
                2191-0855
                16 January 2015
                16 January 2015
                2015
                : 5
                Affiliations
                Biotechnological Applications, G. B. Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment and Development, Kosi-Katarmal, Almora, 263 643 Uttarakhand India
                Article
                92
                10.1186/s13568-014-0092-1
                4544649
                26054732
                b2a5de8d-21b9-41fe-8c20-c9b129e40c25
                © Kaira et al.; licensee Springer. 2015

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited.

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                © The Author(s) 2015

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