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Aging in HIV-Infected Subjects: A New Scenario and a New View

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      Abstract

      The prevalence of HIV-infected people aged 50 years or older is increasing rapidly; the proportion will increase from 28% to 73% in 2030. In addition, HIV-infected individuals may be more vulnerable to age-related condition. There is growing evidence that the prevalence of comorbidities and other age-related conditions (geriatric syndromes, functional or neurocognitive/mental problems, polypharmacy, and social difficulties) is higher in the HIV-infected population than in their uninfected counterparts. However, despite the potential impact of this situation on health care, little information exists about the optimal clinical management of older HIV-infected people. Here we examine the age-related conditions in older HIV-infected persons and address clinical management according to author expertise and published literature. Our aim is to advance the debate about the most appropriate management of this population, including less well-studied aspects, such as frequency of screening for psychological/mental and social and functional capabilities.

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      Most cited references 84

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      Frailty in Older Adults: Evidence for a Phenotype

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        Ageing populations: the challenges ahead.

        If the pace of increase in life expectancy in developed countries over the past two centuries continues through the 21st century, most babies born since 2000 in France, Germany, Italy, the UK, the USA, Canada, Japan, and other countries with long life expectancies will celebrate their 100th birthdays. Although trends differ between countries, populations of nearly all such countries are ageing as a result of low fertility, low immigration, and long lives. A key question is: are increases in life expectancy accompanied by a concurrent postponement of functional limitations and disability? The answer is still open, but research suggests that ageing processes are modifiable and that people are living longer without severe disability. This finding, together with technological and medical development and redistribution of work, will be important for our chances to meet the challenges of ageing populations.
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          Chronic inflammation (inflammaging) and its potential contribution to age-associated diseases.

          Human aging is characterized by a chronic, low-grade inflammation, and this phenomenon has been termed as "inflammaging." Inflammaging is a highly significant risk factor for both morbidity and mortality in the elderly people, as most if not all age-related diseases share an inflammatory pathogenesis. Nevertheless, the precise etiology of inflammaging and its potential causal role in contributing to adverse health outcomes remain largely unknown. The identification of pathways that control age-related inflammation across multiple systems is therefore important in order to understand whether treatments that modulate inflammaging may be beneficial in old people. The session on inflammation of the Advances in Gerosciences meeting held at the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging in Bethesda on October 30 and 31, 2013 was aimed at defining these important unanswered questions about inflammaging. This article reports the main outcomes of this session. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            1Lluita contra la Sida Foundation, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Badalona, Spain
            2Universitat de Vic-Universidad Central de Catalunya (UVIC-UCC), Vic, Spain
            3Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
            4Department of Infectious Diseases, Hospital San Pedro-CIBIR, Logroño, Spain
            5AIDS Research Institute-IRSICAIXA, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Badalona, Spain
            6Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA
            7Neuropsychology Unit-Brain, Cognition and Behavior: Clinical Research, Consorci Sanitari de Terrassa, Barcelona, Spain
            8Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences for Children & Adults, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
            9University College Dublin School of Medicine and Medical Science, Dublin, Ireland
            10Geriatric Department, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, CIBERFES, Madrid, Spain
            Author notes

            Academic Editor: Lucia Lopalco

            Contributors
            ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5298-1734
            Journal
            Biomed Res Int
            Biomed Res Int
            BMRI
            BioMed Research International
            Hindawi
            2314-6133
            2314-6141
            2017
            21 December 2017
            : 2017
            5753008
            10.1155/2017/5897298
            Copyright © 2017 Eugenia Negredo et al.

            This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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