Blog
About

11
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Colonization with third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae on hospital admission: prevalence and risk factors.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The objectives of this study were to prospectively assess the rectal carriage rate of third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (3GCREB) in non-ICU patients on hospital admission and to investigate resistance mechanisms and risk factors for carriage.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 34

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Development of a set of multiplex PCR assays for the detection of genes encoding important beta-lactamases in Enterobacteriaceae.

          To develop a rapid and reliable tool to detect by multiplex PCR assays the most frequently widespread beta-lactamase genes encoding the OXA-1-like broad-spectrum beta-lactamases, extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamases and class A, B and D carbapenemases. Following the design of a specific group of primers and optimization using control strains, a set of six multiplex PCRs and one simplex PCR was created. An evaluation of the set was performed using a collection of 31 Enterobacteriaceae strains isolated from clinical specimens showing a resistance phenotype towards broad-spectrum cephalosporins and/or cephamycins and/or carbapenems. Direct sequencing from PCR products was subsequently carried out to identify beta-lactamase genes. Under optimized conditions, all positive controls confirmed the specificity of group-specific PCR primers. Except for the detection of carbapenemase genes, multiplex and simplex PCR assays were carried out using the same PCR conditions, allowing assays to be performed in a single run. Out of 31 isolates selected, 22 strains produced an ESBL, mostly CTX-M-15 but also CTX-M-1 and CTX-M-9, SHV-12, SHV-5, SHV-2, TEM-21, TEM-52 and a VEB-type ESBL, 6 strains produced a plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase (five DHA-1 and one CMY-2) and 3 strains produced both an ESBL (two SHV-12, one CTX-M-15) and a plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase (DHA-1). We report here the development of a useful method composed of a set of six multiplex PCRs and one simplex PCR for the rapid screening of the most frequently encountered beta-lactamases. This method allowed direct sequencing from the PCR products.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Rapid evolution and spread of carbapenemases among Enterobacteriaceae in Europe.

            Plasmid-acquired carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae, which were first discovered in Europe in the 1990s, are now increasingly being identified at an alarming rate. Although their hydrolysis spectrum may vary, they hydrolyse most β-lactams, including carbapenems. They are mostly of the KPC, VIM, NDM and OXA-48 types. Their prevalence in Europe as reported in 2011 varies significantly from high (Greece and Italy) to low (Nordic countries). The types of carbapenemase vary among countries, partially depending on the cultural/population exchange relationship between the European countries and the possible reservoirs of each carbapenemase. Carbapenemase producers are mainly identified among Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, and still mostly in hospital settings and rarely in the community. Although important nosocomial outbreaks with carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae have been extensively reported, many new cases are still related to importation from a foreign country. Rapid identification of colonized or infected patients and screening of carriers is possible, and will probably be effective for prevention of a scenario of endemicity, as now reported for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (mainly CTX-M) producers in all European countries. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Dutch patients, retail chicken meat and poultry share the same ESBL genes, plasmids and strains.

              Intestinal carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) -producing bacteria in food-producing animals and contamination of retail meat may contribute to increased incidences of infections with ESBL-producing bacteria in humans. Therefore, distribution of ESBL genes, plasmids and strain genotypes in Escherichia coli obtained from poultry and retail chicken meat in the Netherlands was determined and defined as 'poultry-associated' (PA). Subsequently, the proportion of E. coli isolates with PA ESBL genes, plasmids and strains was quantified in a representative sample of clinical isolates. The E. coli were derived from 98 retail chicken meat samples, a prevalence survey among poultry, and 516 human clinical samples from 31 laboratories collected during a 3-month period in 2009. Isolates were analysed using an ESBL-specific microarray, sequencing of ESBL genes, PCR-based replicon typing of plasmids, plasmid multi-locus sequence typing (pMLST) and strain genotyping (MLST). Six ESBL genes were defined as PA (bla(CTX-M-1) , bla(CTX-M-2) , bla(SHV-2) , bla(SHV-12) , bla(TEM-20) , bla(TEM-52) ): 35% of the human isolates contained PA ESBL genes and 19% contained PA ESBL genes located on IncI1 plasmids that were genetically indistinguishable from those obtained from poultry (meat). Of these ESBL genes, 86% were bla(CTX-M-1) and bla(TEM-52) genes, which were also the predominant genes in poultry (78%) and retail chicken meat (75%). Of the retail meat samples, 94% contained ESBL-producing isolates of which 39% belonged to E. coli genotypes also present in human samples. These findings are suggestive for transmission of ESBL genes, plasmids and E. coli isolates from poultry to humans, most likely through the food chain. 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection; 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                J. Antimicrob. Chemother.
                The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                1460-2091
                0305-7453
                Oct 2016
                : 71
                : 10
                Affiliations
                [1 ] German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Germany Institute for Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
                [2 ] German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Germany Institute for Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, National Reference Centre for the Surveillance of Nosocomial Infections, Charité-University Hospital, Berlin, Germany.
                [3 ] German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Germany Institute for Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
                [4 ] German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Germany Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine II, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
                [5 ] German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Germany Institute for Medical Microbiology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Lübeck, Germany.
                [6 ] German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Germany Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
                [7 ] German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Germany Institute for Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, University Medical Centre Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
                [8 ] German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Germany Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine 1, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
                [9 ] German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Germany Institute for Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany harald.seifert@uni-koeln.de.
                [10 ] German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Germany Institute for Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, National Reference Centre for the Surveillance of Nosocomial Infections, Charité-University Hospital, Berlin, Germany Department of Hospital Hygiene and Infection Control, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
                Article
                dkw216
                10.1093/jac/dkw216
                27317445

                Comments

                Comment on this article

                Similar content 72

                Cited by 22

                Most referenced authors 436