Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Spectrums and Prognosis of Kidney Disease in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background/Aims: Renal involvement was a common extra-articular manifestation of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Few reports have investigated the pathological characteristics and renal outcomes of AS patients with kidney disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathological spectrums and the renal prognosis of AS patients with kidney disease. Methods: This retrospective and observational study was conducted working on 62 patients (47 males and 15 females) with a diagnosis of AS (ACR, 1984) and renal biopsies between 2008 and 2017. The histopathological findings and associated clinical manifestations were collected, and the renal prognoses of patients with kidney disease were evaluated too. Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for the occurrence of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Results: Renal biopsy revealed that IgAN accounted for a majority (74.2%) of the kidney disease with AS, while membranous nephropathies, minimal change disease, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, and other lesions accounted for a small minority. Multivariate analysis revealed that serum immunoglobulin A >3.45 g/L and immunoglobulin G >9.06 g/L were risk factors for the occurrence of IgAN. With a median follow-up time of 24.3 months, 28 patients (50.9%) reached complete remission, 9 patients (16.4%) had partial remission, and 1 patient had an eGFR decline >30%. No difference was found in prognosis between IgAN and non-IgAN. Conclusion: IgAN occurred in 76.4% of the kidney disease with AS, and higher serum immunoglobulin A and G increased the risk for the occurrence of IgAN. The renal prognosis of kidney disease in AS was good.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 32

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Dysbiosis and zonulin upregulation alter gut epithelial and vascular barriers in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

          Dysbiosis has been recently demonstrated in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) but its implications in the modulation of intestinal immune responses have never been studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ileal bacteria in modulating local and systemic immune responses in AS.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Microscopic gut inflammation in axial spondyloarthritis: a multiparametric predictive model.

            To assess the rates and explore predictors of microscopic gut inflammation in a cohort of patients with axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA). Ileocolonoscopy was performed in 65 patients with axial and peripheral SpA from the Gent Inflammatory Arthritis and spoNdylitis cohorT. Histopathological analysis and scoring were performed by an experienced pathologist. Overall, 46.2% of the patients with SpA showed microscopic gut inflammation. In axial SpA, the following parameters were independently associated with gut involvement: male sex (OR=8.9, p=0.035); high disease activity measured by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (OR=2.05, p=0.032); restricted spinal mobility measured by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (OR=1.94, p=0.009); and younger age (OR=0.85, p=0.013). No clear association was found for human leucocyte antigen-B27 status, presence of peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, uveitis, psoriasis, intake of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and family history of SpA. The prevalence of gut inflammation in non-radiographic axial SpA and ankylosing spondylitis was comparable. The prevalence of microscopic gut inflammation in SpA remains unaltered over time. Younger age (shorter symptom duration), progressive disease, male sex and higher disease activity are independently associated with microscopic gut inflammation in axial SpA.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found
              Is Open Access

              IgA nephropathy and IgA vasculitis with nephritis have a shared feature involving galactose-deficient IgA1-oriented pathogenesis

              Galactose-deficient IgA1 has been proposed as an important effector molecule in IgA nephropathy (IgAN). We previously showed that the galactose-deficient IgA1-specific monoclonal antibody KM55 can detect circulating galactose-deficient IgA1 in patients with IgAN, enabling us to study the molecular roles of galactose-deficient IgA1. Herein, we further examined the pathophysiological significance of galactose-deficient IgA1 in glomerular deposits of patients with IgAN by immunohistochemistry using KM55. Immunostaining of galactose-deficient IgA1 with KM55 was performed in paraffin-embedded sections of renal biopsy specimens from 48 patients with IgAN and 49 patients with other renal diseases such as lupus nephritis, HCV-related nephropathy, IgA vasculitis with nephritis (IgA-VN), and membranous nephropathy. Glomerular galactose-deficient IgA1 was specifically detected in IgAN and IgA-VN but not in the other renal diseases. Galactose-deficient IgA1 was localized predominantly in the mesangial region as IgA deposition. However, galactose-deficient IgA1 was not detected in patients with lupus nephritis accompanied by glomerular IgA deposition. Thus, our study strongly suggests that IgAN and IgA-VN have a shared feature regarding galactose-deficient IgA1-oriented pathogenesis.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                KDD
                KDD
                10.1159/issn.2296-9357
                Kidney Diseases
                S. Karger AG
                2296-9381
                2296-9357
                2020
                November 2020
                26 August 2020
                : 6
                : 6
                : 444-452
                Affiliations
                aNational Clinical Research Center of Kidney Disease, Jinling Medical College of Nanjing Medical University, Najing, China
                bNephrology Department, Northern Jiangsu People’s Hospital Affiliated to Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, China
                cNational Clinical Research Center of Kidney Disease, Jinling Medical College of Nanjing University, Najing, China
                Author notes
                *Zheng Tang, National Clinical Research Center of Kidney Disease, Jinling Medical College of Nanjing Medical University, 305 East Zhong Shan Road, Nanjing 210002 (China), tang_dr@163.com
                Article
                509248 Kidney Dis 2020;6:444–452
                10.1159/000509248
                © 2020 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel

                This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND). Usage and distribution for commercial purposes as well as any distribution of modified material requires written permission. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Tables: 6, Pages: 9
                Categories
                Research Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article