1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
2 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      On the taxonomy of Heterarthrus (Hymenoptera, Tenthredinidae), with a review of the West Palaearctic species

      , ,

      Journal of Hymenoptera Research

      Pensoft Publishers

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The sawfly genus Heterarthrus is naturally distributed in the Palaearctic, with a single described Oriental species. Their larvae mine in the leaves of trees and shrubs of Salicaceae, Betulaceae, and Sapindaceae ( Acer). We here recognise twelve West Palaearctic species as valid, with the status of two additional nominal species group taxa in need of further study: fruticicolum Ermolenko, and smithi Ermolenko. A key to adults of the species occurring in the West Palaearctic is presented. Two new species are described: Heterarthus vikbergi Liston, Mutanen & Viitasaari, sp. nov. from females and males reared from leaf-mines in Populus balsamifera collected in eastern Finland, and Heterarthrus fiora Liston, sp. nov. from females reared from Acer pseudoplatanus. The latter is a widespread European species, previously misidentified as Heterarthrus aceris (Kaltenbach, 1856). New junior subjective synonyms are Phyllotoma aceris Kaltenbach, 1856 of Heterarthrus leucomela (Klug, 1818), H. aihinoensis Haris, 2006 of H. kamtchaticus (Malaise, 1931) sp. rev., and H. imbrosensis Schedl, 1981 of H. wuestneii (Konow, 1905). Lectotypes are designated for Phyllotoma flavicollis Gussakovskij, 1947, P. kamtchatica Malaise, 1931, and Tenthredo ochropoda Klug, 1818.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 18

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The on-again, off-again relationship between mitochondrial genomes and species boundaries

          The study of reproductive isolation and species barriers frequently focuses on mitochondrial genomes and has produced two alternative and almost diametrically opposed narratives. On one hand, mtDNA may be at the forefront of speciation events, with coevolved mitonuclear interactions responsible for some of the earliest genetic incompatibilities arising among isolated populations. On the other hand, there are numerous cases of introgression of mtDNA across species boundaries even when nuclear gene flow is restricted. We argue that these seemingly contradictory patterns can result from a single underlying cause. Specifically, the accumulation of deleterious mutations in mtDNA creates a problem with two alternative evolutionary solutions. In some cases, compensatory or epistatic changes in the nuclear genome may ameliorate the effects of mitochondrial mutations, thereby establishing coadapted mitonuclear genotypes within populations and forming the basis of reproductive incompatibilities between populations. Alternatively, populations with high mitochondrial mutation loads may be rescued by replacement with a more fit, foreign mitochondrial haplotype. Coupled with many non-adaptive mechanisms of introgression that can preferentially affect cytoplasmic genomes, this form of adaptive introgression may contribute to the widespread discordance between mitochondrial and nuclear genealogies. Here, we review recent advances related to mitochondrial introgression and mitonuclear incompatibilities, including the potential for cointrogression of mtDNA and interacting nuclear genes. We also address an emerging controversy over the classic assumption that selection on mitochondrial genomes is inefficient and discuss the mechanisms that lead lineages down alternative evolutionary paths in response to mitochondrial mutation accumulation.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            World Catalog of Symphyta (Hymenoptera)

            The first complete World Catalog of sawflies (Hymenoptera, suborder Symphyta) for over 100 years is presented. It contains references to the original descriptions and provides brief distributional data for 803 genera, 8353 species (123 with two or more subspecies) and 161 subspecies in addition to the nominal subspecies. 15245 proposed names are treated, including replacement names, infrasubspecific names and nomina nuda, of which only 22 could not be checked in the original publications. Current taxonomic placement of genera and species and occurrence in zoogeographic regions are indicated. The list of names contains 31245 name combinations, variant spellings and family-group names. The authors attempted to consult all publications with taxonomic content referring to Symphyta that have appeared up to 31.12.2009. The 2960 cited references include all those that are known to contain original descriptions of taxa. Short biographical data and portraits of 168 symphytologists as well as images of representatives of extant sawfly taxa are included.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Phylogenetics and evolution of host-plant use in leaf-mining sawflies (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae: Heterarthrinae).

              The habit of mining within leaves has evolved convergently in numerous plant-feeding insect taxa. Many leaf-mining groups contain a large number of species with distinct feeding preferences, which makes them highly suitable for studies on the evolutionary history of host-plant use and on the role of niche shifts in speciation. We aimed to clarify the origin, classification, and ecological evolution of the tenthredinid sawfly subfamily Heterarthrinae, which contains c. 150 leaf-mining species that collectively feed on over 20 plant genera around the world. For this, we reconstructed the phylogeny of representative heterarthrine species and diverse outgroups from the superfamily Tenthredinoidea on the basis of DNA sequence data collected from two mitochondrial (CoI and Cytb) and two nuclear (EF-1α and NaK) genes. Thereafter, we inferred the history of niche diversification within Heterarthrinae by plotting larval host-plant associations on the trees, and by contrasting a time-calibrated leaf-miner phylogeny with the phylogeny of their host plants. The results show that: (1) heterarthrine leaf-miners constitute a monophyletic group that arose from external-feeding blennocampine lineages within the Tenthredinidae c. 110-80 million years ago; (2) heterarthrines generally radiated well after their host taxa, and extant host-plant associations therefore result from a combination of host conservatism and occasional shifts among available plant taxa; and (3) diversification in Heterarthrinae apparently occurs by multiple mechanisms, including sympatric or allopatric ecological speciation, non-ecological allopatric speciation, and possibly allochronic speciation. Overall, both present and historical host-use patterns within the Heterarthrinae exhibit striking similarities to patterns found in co-occurring herbivore taxa. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Hymenoptera Research
                JHR
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2607
                1070-9428
                October 31 2019
                October 31 2019
                : 72
                : 83-126
                Article
                10.3897/jhr.72.39339
                © 2019

                Comments

                Comment on this article