0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Emerging drugs for gastroesophageal reflux disease

      Expert Opinion on Emerging Drugs

      Informa Healthcare

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 47

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Epidemiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a systematic review.

          A systematic review of the epidemiology of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) has been performed, applying strict criteria for quality of studies and the disease definition used. The prevalence and incidence of GORD was estimated from 15 studies which defined GORD as at least weekly heartburn and/or acid regurgitation and met criteria concerning sample size, response rate, and recall period. Data on factors associated with GORD were also evaluated. An approximate prevalence of 10-20% was identified for GORD, defined by at least weekly heartburn and/or acid regurgitation in the Western world while in Asia this was lower, at less than 5%. The incidence in the Western world was approximately 5 per 1000 person years. A number of potential risk factors (for example, an immediate family history and obesity) and comorbidities (for example, respiratory diseases and chest pain) associated with GORD were identified. Data reported in this systematic review can be interpreted with confidence as reflecting the epidemiology of "true" GORD. The disease is more common in the Western world than in Asia, and the low rate of incidence relative to prevalence reflects its chronicity. The small number of studies eligible for inclusion in this review highlights the need for global consensus on a symptom based definition of GORD.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Systematic review: proton-pump inhibitor failure in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease--where next?

            Proton-pump inhibitor failure has become a common clinical dilemma in gastrointestinal clinics and has been increasingly encountered at the primary care level as well. Underlying mechanisms are diverse and may overlap. Most patients who have proton-pump inhibitor failure are likely to originate from the non-erosive reflux disease phenotype. Currently, available diagnostic modalities provide limited clues to the exact underlying cause. Treatment relies primarily on escalating dosing of proton-pump inhibitors. However, new insights into the pathophysiology of proton-pump inhibitor failure are likely to provide alternative therapeutic options.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Simultaneous intraesophageal impedance and pH measurement of acid and nonacid gastroesophageal reflux: effect of omeprazole.

              Nonacid reflux may explain symptoms in acid-suppressed patients. Simultaneous intraesophageal impedance and pH measurement was used to evaluate the frequencies of postprandial acid and nonacid reflux before and after omeprazole administration. Twelve heartburn patients underwent two 2-hour studies of intraesophageal impedance and pH in the right lateral decubitus position after a refluxogenic meal; session 1 without medication, session 2 after 7 days of omeprazole twice daily. Acid and nonacid reflux were quantified. Two hundred seventeen reflux episodes were detected before and 261 after omeprazole treatment (P > 0.05). Percentage of acid reflux decreased (from 45% to 3%, P = 0.02) and nonacid reflux increased (from 55% to 97%, P = 0.03) after omeprazole. Heartburn and acid taste were more commonly linked to acid reflux but were also produced by nonacid reflux. Regurgitation was reported equally in acid and nonacid reflux. Delta(pH) > 1 did not help predict the presence of symptoms during nonacid reflux. During treatment with omeprazole, postprandial reflux becomes predominantly nonacid. Symptoms are more common with acid reflux but are also produced by nonacid reflux. Simultaneous intraesophageal impedance and pH may be useful in evaluating the role of nonacid reflux in symptoms that persist despite adequate acid suppression.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Expert Opinion on Emerging Drugs
                Expert Opinion on Emerging Drugs
                Informa Healthcare
                1472-8214
                1744-7623
                July 23 2009
                September 2009
                August 04 2009
                September 2009
                : 14
                : 3
                : 481-491
                Article
                10.1517/14728210903133807
                © 2009

                Comments

                Comment on this article