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      MaGe: a microbial genome annotation system supported by synteny results

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          Abstract

          Magnifying Genomes (MaGe) is a microbial genome annotation system based on a relational database containing information on bacterial genomes, as well as a web interface to achieve genome annotation projects. Our system allows one to initiate the annotation of a genome at the early stage of the finishing phase. MaGe's main features are (i) integration of annotation data from bacterial genomes enhanced by a gene coding re-annotation process using accurate gene models, (ii) integration of results obtained with a wide range of bioinformatics methods, among which exploration of gene context by searching for conserved synteny and reconstruction of metabolic pathways, (iii) an advanced web interface allowing multiple users to refine the automatic assignment of gene product functions. MaGe is also linked to numerous well-known biological databases and systems. Our system has been thoroughly tested during the annotation of complete bacterial genomes ( Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1, Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis, Frankia alni) and is currently used in the context of several new microbial genome annotation projects. In addition, MaGe allows for annotation curation and exploration of already published genomes from various genera (e.g. Yersinia, Bacillus and Neisseria). MaGe can be accessed at http://www.genoscope.cns.fr/agc/mage.

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          Most cited references 51

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          Identification of common molecular subsequences.

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            Assigning protein functions by comparative genome analysis: protein phylogenetic profiles.

            Determining protein functions from genomic sequences is a central goal of bioinformatics. We present a method based on the assumption that proteins that function together in a pathway or structural complex are likely to evolve in a correlated fashion. During evolution, all such functionally linked proteins tend to be either preserved or eliminated in a new species. We describe this property of correlated evolution by characterizing each protein by its phylogenetic profile, a string that encodes the presence or absence of a protein in every known genome. We show that proteins having matching or similar profiles strongly tend to be functionally linked. This method of phylogenetic profiling allows us to predict the function of uncharacterized proteins.
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              The TIGRFAMs database of protein families.

              TIGRFAMs is a collection of manually curated protein families consisting of hidden Markov models (HMMs), multiple sequence alignments, commentary, Gene Ontology (GO) assignments, literature references and pointers to related TIGRFAMs, Pfam and InterPro models. These models are designed to support both automated and manually curated annotation of genomes. TIGRFAMs contains models of full-length proteins and shorter regions at the levels of superfamilies, subfamilies and equivalogs, where equivalogs are sets of homologous proteins conserved with respect to function since their last common ancestor. The scope of each model is set by raising or lowering cutoff scores and choosing members of the seed alignment to group proteins sharing specific function (equivalog) or more general properties. The overall goal is to provide information with maximum utility for the annotation process. TIGRFAMs is thus complementary to Pfam, whose models typically achieve broad coverage across distant homologs but end at the boundaries of conserved structural domains. The database currently contains over 1600 protein families. TIGRFAMs is available for searching or downloading at www.tigr.org/TIGRFAMs.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nucleic Acids Res
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Oxford University Press
                0305-1048
                1362-4962
                2006
                2006
                10 January 2006
                : 34
                : 1
                : 53-65
                Affiliations
                Atelier de Génomique Comparative, CNRS-UMR8030 2 rue Gaston Crémieux, 91057 Evry, Cedex, France
                1Genoscope 2 rue Gaston Crémieux, 91057 Evry, Cedex, France
                Author notes
                *To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel: +33 1 60 87 84 53; Fax: +33 1 60 87 25 14; Email: vallenet@ 123456genoscope.cns.fr
                Article
                10.1093/nar/gkj406
                1326237
                16407324
                © The Author 2006. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

                The online version of this article has been published under an open access model. Users are entitled to use, reproduce, disseminate, or display the open access version of this article for non-commercial purposes provided that: the original authorship is properly and fully attributed; the Journal and Oxford University Press are attributed as the original place of publication with the correct citation details given; if an article is subsequently reproduced or disseminated not in its entirety but only in part or as a derivative work this must be clearly indicated. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@ 123456oxfordjournals.org

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                Genetics

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