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      Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy in Acute Renal Failure

      Kidney and Blood Pressure Research

      S. Karger AG

      Acute renal failure, Hemodialysis, Continuous venovenous hemofiltration

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          Abstract

          The management of acute renal failure in the critically ill patient is extremely variable and there are no published standards for the provision of renal replacement therapy in this population. Continuous renal replacement therapy seems to be the treatment of choice because of its superior metabolic and hemodynamic control. There is better organ protection by continuous treatment but no evidence for better survival or renal recovery due to continuous treatment. The debate about optimal membrane as well as about optimal dialysis dose is ongoing. An effluent flow rate of at least 35 ml/kg/h as well as lower BUN level at treatment initiation seem to be necessary to provide better survival rate. Peritoneal dialysis is a less suitable option in continuous renal replacement of the adult intensive care patient but hybrid methods such as extended daily dialysis and sustained low efficient daily dialysis need consideration with respect to continuous hemofiltration/dialysis.

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          Most cited references 15

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          Effects of different doses in continuous veno-venous haemofiltration on outcomes of acute renal failure: a prospective randomised trial.

          Continuous veno-venous haemofiltration is increasingly used to treat acute renal failure in critically ill patients, but a clear definition of an adequate treatment dose has not been established. We undertook a prospective randomised study of the impact different ultrafiltration doses in continuous renal replacement therapy on survival. We enrolled 425 patients, with a mean age of 61 years, in intensive care who had acute renal failure. Patients were randomly assigned ultrafiltration at 20 mL h(-1) kg(-1) (group 1, n=146), 35 mL h(-1) kg(-1) (group 2, n=139), or 45 mL h(-1) kg(-1) (group 3, n=140). The primary endpoint was survival at 15 days after stopping haemofiltration. We also assessed recovery of renal function and frequency of complications during treatment. Analysis was by intention to treat. Survival in group 1 was significantly lower than in groups 2 (p=0.0007) and 3 (p=0.0013). Survival in groups 2 and 3 did not differ significantly (p=0.87). Adjustment for possible confounding factors did not change the pattern of differences among the groups. Survivors in all groups had lower concentrations of blood urea nitrogen before continuous haemofiltration was started than non-survivors. 95%, 92%, and 90% of survivors in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively, had full recovery of renal function. The frequency of complications was similarly low in all groups. Mortality among these critically ill patients was high, but increase in the rate of ultrafiltration improved survival significantly. We recommend that ultrafiltration should be prescribed according to patient's bodyweight and should reach at least 35 mL h(-1) kg(-1).
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            Daily hemodialysis and the outcome of acute renal failure.

            Intermittent hemodialysis is widely used as renal-replacement therapy in patients with acute renal failure, but an adequate dose has not been defined. We performed a prospective study to determine the effect of daily intermittent hemodialysis, as compared with conventional (alternate-day) intermittent hemodialysis, on survival among patients with acute renal failure. A total of 160 patients with acute renal failure were assigned to receive daily or conventional intermittent hemodialysis. Survival was the primary end point of the study. The duration of acute renal failure and the frequency of therapy-related complications were secondary end points. The two study groups were similar with respect to age, sex, cause and severity of acute renal failure, medical or surgical intensive care setting, and the score on the Acute Physiology, Age, and Chronic Health Evaluation. Daily hemodialysis resulted in better control of uremia, fewer hypotensive episodes during hemodialysis, and more rapid resolution of acute renal failure (mean [+/-SD], 9+/-2 vs. 16+/-6 days; P=0.001) than did conventional hemodialysis. The mortality rate, according to the intention-to-treat analysis, was 28 percent for daily dialysis and 46 percent for alternate-day dialysis (P=0.01). In a multiple regression analysis, less frequent hemodialysis (on alternate days, as opposed to daily) was an independent risk factor for death. The high mortality rate among critically ill patients with acute renal failure who require renal-replacement therapy is related to both coexisting conditions and uremic damage to other organ systems. Intensive hemodialysis reduces mortality without increasing hemodynamically induced morbidity.
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              Effects of early high-volume continuous venovenous hemofiltration on survival and recovery of renal function in intensive care patients with acute renal failure: A prospective, randomized trial

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                KBR
                Kidney Blood Press Res
                10.1159/issn.1420-4096
                Kidney and Blood Pressure Research
                S. Karger AG
                978-3-8055-7600-0
                978-3-318-00991-0
                1420-4096
                1423-0143
                2003
                2003
                05 June 2003
                : 26
                : 2
                : 123-127
                Affiliations
                Medizinische Klinik III, Klinikum Darmstadt, Germany
                Article
                70995 Kidney Blood Press Res 2003;26:123–127
                10.1159/000070995
                12771538
                © 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                References: 35, Pages: 5
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                Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/70995
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